Monday, September 26, 2016

Turbulent Times, Creative Minds: Erich Neumann and C.G. Jung in Relationship





This volume of essays by well-known Jungian analysts and scholars provides the most comprehensive comparison to date between the works of C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann. Reflections are based on their extensive correspondence recently published, their differing cultural backgrounds, and the turbulent times surrounding their personal and professional relationship. Among the many specific subjects discussed are Jung and Neumann on art and religion, their views on the problem of evil, and clinical aspects of Neumann’s work. Also included are personal memories of both Jung and Neumann family members.
The book includes exclusive photos from Eranos, and several illustrations in color.

Contents:

Introduction (Erel Shalit and Murray Stein) ix
I. The Correspondence (1933–1960)
Uncertain Friends in Particular Matters: The Relationship between C. G. Jung and
Erich Neumann (Martin Liebscher) 25

Companions on the Way: Consciousness in Conflict (Nancy Swift Furlotti) 45

Neumann and Kirsch in Tel Aviv: A Case of Sibling Rivalry? (Ann Lammers) 71

II. Cultural Backgrounds
German Kultur and the Discovery of the Unconscious: The Promise and Discontents of the German-Jewish Experience (Paul Mendes-Flohr) 83

Basel, Jung’s Cultural Background and the Proto-Zionism of Samuel Preiswerk (Ulrich Hoerni) 95

The Cultural Psyche: From Ancestral Roots to Postmodern Routes (Erel Shalit) 111

III. Troubled Times
Carl Jung and Hans Fierz in Palestine and Egypt: Journey from March 13th to
April 6th, 1933 (Andreas Jung) 131

1933—The Year of Jung’s Journey to Palestine/Israel and Several Beginnings (Thomas Fischer) 135

Jungians in Berlin 1931–1945: Between Therapy, Emigration and Resistance (Jörg Rasche) 151

IV. The Problem of Evil
The Search for a New Ethic: Professional and Clinical Dilemmas (Henry Abramovitch) 167

Erich Neumann and C. G. Jung on “The Problem of Evil” (Murray Stein) 185

V. Neumann and Eranos (1948–1960)
Neumann at Eranos (Riccardo Bernardini) 199

“Dear, dear Olga!” - A Letter to Olga Fröbe-Kapteyn (Julie Neumann) 237

VI. On the Arts
The Great Mother in Israeli Art (Gideon Ofrat) 245

Jung, Neumann and Art (Christian Gaillard) 261

The Magic Flute (Tom Kelly) 299

A Brief Comment on Neumann and His Essay “On Mozart’s ‘Magic Flute’” (Debora Kutzinski) 309

VII. Clinical Contributions
Erich Neumann’s Concept of the Distress-ego (Rina Porat) 315

Can You Hear My Voice? (Batya Brosh Palmoni) 333

Neve Tzeelim—A Field of Creation and Development (Rivka Lahav) 347

VIII. On Religion
Erich Neumann and Hasidism (Tamar Kron) 367

Theological Positions in the Correspondence between Jung and Neumann (Angelica Löwe) 385

IX. On Synchronicity
Toward Psychoid Aspects of Evolutionary Theory (Joseph Cambray) 401

X. “Memories from My (Grand)Father’s House”
Introduction 411
Some Memories of My Grandparents (Andreas Jung) 413
Memories (Ulrich Hoerni) 415
Memories (Micha Neumann) 417
Memories (Ralli Loewenthal-Neumann) 421
Memories (Debora Kutzinski) 425
A Response (Thomas B. Kirsch) 429
Remembering the Mamas and Papas (Nomi Kluger Nash) 433
Memories of Max Zeller (1904–1978) (Jacqueline Zeller) 437

Bibliography

About the Contributors


Cover image by Mordecai Ardon

Available at Amazonand at Chiron


***********
Jacob and Esau 
On the Collective Symbolism of the Brother Motif (2nd printing)
by Erich Neumann

cover image by Meir Gur Arieh 



Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Redeeming the Feminine: Eros and the World Soul

Nancy Qualls-Corbett, Ph.D. is a practicing analyst in Birmingham, Alabama since 1981. A diplomat of the C.G. Jung Institute, Zurich, she is the author of The Sacred Prostitute: Eternal Aspect of the Feminine and Awakening Woman: Dreams and Individuation. She has also contributed to the book The Secrets of Mary Magdalene. Nancy combines her love of mythology and travel in teaching seminars in Greece, Italy, Egypt, and Canada.

Nancy Qualls-Corbett has contributed the chapter Redeeming the Feminine: Eros and the World Soul to The Dream and its Amplification.

Nancy says:
In the body of his work, Dr. C.G. Jung explains the dynamics not only the personal psyche and the personal association to one’s dreams but also the far reaching effects of the collective unconscious. These archetypal elements connect past and present that mirror a more universal aspect, the World Soul, the Anima Mundi. Redeeming the Feminine presents the dreams of a woman that depict not only the abuse and repression of the feminine principle, a term Jung referred to as Eros, but also how these vital images of psyche reflect the essence of the feminine principle onto a greater dimension. Her dreams also lead us to a more conscious understanding of how one may begin to redeem the feminine principle in one’s life and how that healing process may be reflected in the World Soul.
A Giant Dream© from an original painting
by Howard Fox www.howardfox.com

The Dream and Its Amplification unveils the language of the psyche that speaks to us in our dreams. We all dream at least 4-6 times each night yet remember very few. Those that rise to the surface of our conscious awareness beckon to be understood, like a letter addressed to us that arrives by post. Why would we not open it? The difficulty is in understanding what the dream symbols and images mean.

Through amplification, C.G. Jung formulated a method of unveiling the deeper meaning of symbolic images. This becomes particularly important when the image does not carry a personal meaning or significance and is not part of a person's everyday life.

Contents 

I. The Amplified World of Dreams - Erel Shalit and Nancy Swift Furlotti

II. Pane e’ Vino: Learning to Discern the Objective, Archetypal Nature of Dreams - Michael Conforti

III. Amplification: A Personal Narrative - Thomas Singer

IV. Redeeming the Feminine: Eros and the World Soul - Nancy Qualls-Corbett

V. Wild Cats and Crowned Snakes: Archetypal Agents of Feminine Initiation - Nancy Swift Furlotti

VI. A Dream in Arcadia - Christian Gaillard

VII. Muse of the Moon: Poetry from the Dreamtime - Naomi Ruth Lowinsky

VIII. Dreaming the Face of the Earth: Myth, Culture, and Dreams of the Mayan Shaman - Kenneth Kimmel

IX. Coal or Gold? The Symbolic Understanding of Alpine Legends - Gotthilf Isler

X. Sophia’s Dreaming Body: The Night Sky as Alchemical Mirror - Monika Wikman

XI. The Dream Always Follows the Mouth: Jewish Approaches to Dreaming - Henry Abramovitch

XII. Bi-Polarity, Compensation, and the Transcendent Function in Dreams and Visionary Experience: A Jungian Examination of Boehme’s Mandala - Kathryn Madden

XIII. The Dream As Gnostic Myth - Ronald Schenk

XIV. Four Hands in the Crossroads: Amplification in Times of Crisis - Erel Shalit

XV. Dreams and Sudden Death - Gilda Frantz

From a review by Marcus West, in Spring, 2014.
"This book is an exploration of the collective unconscious as witnessed, primarily, through dreams, … it is a celebration, … demonstrating the wisdom of this unconscious self.  
Every single chapter illuminates the process of the self, the collective unconscious and dreams. 
The book is rich and inspirational, encouraging us to trust in the wisdom of the psyche and to open ourselves to the lumen naturae of the self. I thoroughly recommend it."
The book can be purchased from Amazon or directly from Fisher King Press

Saturday, September 17, 2016

Four Hands in the Crossroads: Amplification in Times of Crisis


The chapter 'Four Hands in the Crossroads: Amplification in Times of Crisis' in The Dream and its Amplification, discusses dreams and amplification in times of crisis and turmoil, observing and explaining the increased synchronicity that may take place under such circumstances.

The upstretched hands of Tanit at Tel Hazor.
Collection of Israel Antiquities Authority, photo copyright Israel Museum, Jerusalem

The following is excerpted from the introduction to the chapter:

In amplification, we reach out beyond the boundaries of our ego, beyond the realm of ego consciousness, which by definition is temporary and limited. We humbly admit that our ego-identity is not the one and only, the grand-all and be-all. By amplification we recognize that the images that arise from the unconscious have a life of their own, and that the world of matter and psyche exists in itself, even when out of the beholder’s sight. The “I” of my awareness is not the grand creator of the image, but partakes, sometimes actively, in that greater whole, in a reality of spirit and matter that exists and lives, even if I am absent. When in dialogue with the living image, I neither deny its existence, nor do I believe that I am its sole creator.
Thus, amplification does not only entail seeking parallels to one’s personal experience in mythology and in the history of humankind, but it implies a shift of focus from ego-centeredness to a dialogue between personal consciousness and the objective psyche. Consequently, when amplifying, we consciously reach out and recognize the image’s existence in itself, as well as allowing the image and its symbolic energy to enter consciousness.
Just like the Self seeks its realization in the ego, the objective psyche seeks to manifest itself in the world of consciousness. Amplification facilitates this process, whereby the Self of the objective psyche gains access to the ego of the individual psyche. By means of amplification, the Self, as archetype of meaning, anchors the personal ego in substance and significance. 
  
* * * * * * *
If the images of the objective psyche are too compelling, and the ego and its defenses are too weak, the archetypal world will implode and crash into consciousness, destabilizing the psyche. In psychosis, the archetypal unconscious has unmediated access to the individual psyche. The complexes have sometimes not constellated well enough to carry out their teleological, purposeful process of personalization. In a psychotic condition, the complexes are unable to connect between the realms of archetype and ego, to mediate archetypal substance into the area of the ego and to regulate its assimilation in such a way that archetypal energies mold into personal manifestations. When the ego is too weak and does not have solid enough boundaries, it becomes inundated.
     Individuals react to crisis and turmoil in a variety of ways. On the one hand, some are paralyzed by anxiety, while in others Martian energy is triggered, leading to an increased capacity to act. In times of upheaval and disorder, the objective psyche, the archetypal unconscious, is activated and set in motion. Potentially traumatogenic archetypal matter is heated up and energized, boiling in the vessels more closely beneath the surface. Archetypal forces and images will more easily penetrate cracks in the ego’s defenses, triggering collective fears and complexes, such as the fear that the Holocaust may be repeated.
     Activated archetypal material will find its way and sometimes emerge in the psyche of the person whose doors to the unconscious are open, as happened to Jung prior to World War One. In other instances, the archetypal forces that have been set in motion will penetrate into the psychologically unprepared or unsophisticated individual, as in the case of the young soldier below, and sometimes in the psychologically sensitive and conflicted person, as in the officer, whose dream is also described.

cover image A Giant Dream from an original painting by Howard Fox

The Dream and Its Amplification unveils the language of the psyche that speaks to us in our dreams.

We all dream at least 4-6 times each night yet remember very few. Those that rise to the surface of our conscious awareness beckon to be understood, like a letter addressed to us that arrives by post. Why would we not open it? The difficulty is in understanding what the dream symbols and images mean. Through amplification, C. G. Jung formulated a method of unveiling the deeper meaning of symbolic images. This becomes particularly important when the image does not carry a personal meaning or significance and is not part of a person’s everyday life.

Contents

I.                      The Amplified World of Dreams: Erel Shalit & Nancy Swift Furlotti

II.                    Pane e’ Vino: Learning to discern the objective, archetypal nature of dreams:  Michael Conforti

III.                   Amplification:  A Personal Narrative:  Tom Singer

IV.                   Redeeming the Feminine: Eros and the World Soul: Nancy Qualls-Corbet

V.                    Wild Cats and Crowned Snakes: Archetypal Agents of Feminine Initiation: Nancy Swift Furlotti

VI.                   A Dream in Arcadia:  Christian Gaillard

VII.                  Muse of the Moon: Poetry from the Dreamtime: Naomy Lowinsky

VIII.                Dreaming the ‘Face of the Earth’: Myth, Culture and Dreams of the Mayan Shaman: Ken Kimmel

IX.                   Coal or Gold?: The Symbolic Understanding of a few Alpine Legends: Gotthilf Isler

X.                    Sophia’s Dreaming Body: The Alchemical Mirror of the Night Sky:    Monika Wikman

XI.                   “The Dream Always Follows the Mouth”: Jewish Approaches to Dreaming: Henry Abramovitch

XII.                  Bi-Polarity, Compensation, and The Transcendent Function in Dreams and Visionary Experience: A Jungian Examination of Boehme’s Mandala - Kathryn Madden

XIII.                 The Dream As Gnostic Myth: Ronald Schenk

XIV.                Four Hands in the Crossroads: Dreams in Times of Upheaval -  Erel Shalit

XV.                  Dreams and Sudden Death: Gilda Frantz


Product Details:
Paperback: 220 pages (Large Page Format 9.25" x 7.5")
Publisher: Fisher King Press; 1st edition (June 15, 2013)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1-926715-89-6
ISBN-13: 978-1-926715-89-6
Available at Amazon and Fisher King Press.

Saturday, September 10, 2016

Turbulent Times, Creative Minds: Erich Neumann and C.G. Jung in Relationship (1933-1960)

Erich Neumann at his desk


Now Available!
Turbulent Times, Creative Minds 





This volume of essays by well-known Jungian analysts and scholars provides the most comprehensive comparison to date between the works of C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann. Reflections are based on their extensive correspondence recently published, their differing cultural backgrounds, and the turbulent times surrounding their personal and professional relationship. Among the many specific subjects discussed are Jung and Neumann on art and religion, their views on the problem of evil, and clinical aspects of Neumann’s work. Also included are personal memories of both Jung and Neumann family members.

Sections:
I. The Correspondence (1933–1960)
II. Cultural Backgrounds
III. Troubled Times
IV. The Problem of Evil
V. Neumann and Eranos (1948–1960)
VI. On the Arts
VII. Clinical Contributions
VIII. On Religion
IX. On Synchronicity
X. “Memories from My (Grand)Father’s House”




Available at Amazon, and at Chiron


***********
Jacob and Esau 
On the Collective Symbolism of the Brother Motif (2nd printing)
by Erich Neumann

cover image by Meir Gur Arieh 


title page image by Jacob Steinhardt


Wednesday, August 17, 2016

C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann: Conflict, Philia, and Finding the Other in Oneself

Steve Zemmelman's Profile Photo


Steve Zemmelman has written an excellent review of Erich Neumann's recently published book Jacob and Esau: On the collective symbolism of the brother motif.


In his review, "C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann: Conflict, Philia, and Finding the Other in Oneself," he writes:

Jacob and Esau: On the Collective Symbolism of the Brother Motif is a creative and highly psychological interpretation and extrapolation from the biblical story. The review locates the development of this essay within the relationship between Jung and Neumann, as well as Neumann's own development as a German Jew and analytical psychologist. It shows the origins, within his amplifications of the Jacob and Esau story, of many seminal concepts in Neumann's thinking that became his legacy within Jungian theory, including the ego-self axis and the work on integration of the shadow that was to become Depth Psychology and a New Ethic.



Steve Zemmelman, MSW, PhD, is a Jungian analyst and member of the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco who practices in San Francisco and Berkeley. He is an associate clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California at San Francisco. He has a passion for the value of exploring the intersection of spirituality and psychology, particularly the Jewish mystical tradition. He is the author of eighteen published papers, including “C. G. Jung and the Jewish Soul” in the Winter 2012 edition of JUNG JOURNAL: CULTURE & PSYCHE and “Containing a Jungian Light: The Books of Erel Shalit,” in the 2015 Eranos edition of Spring Journal. Correspondence:.


Saturday, August 13, 2016

Should psychologists and psychoanalysts speak about politics?

Should clinicians and mental health professionals remain with in the closed vessel of the consulting room, or should they step outside these confines and express themselves regarding trends that are taking place in society and the world, about elections and candidates, about democracy and the characteristics of different regimes?

Psychoanalysts such as Freud, Jung, Winnicott, Erik Erikson, Erich Fromm, Erich Neumann and others have often stepped outside the consulting room and looked at the world and society around them.

C.G. Jung writes in his preface to "Essays on Contemporary Events,"

The storm of events does not sweep down upon him [the doctor] only from the great world outside; he feels the violence of its impact even in the quiet of his consulting-room ... 
As he has a responsibility towards his patients, he cannot afford to withdraw to the peaceful island of undisturbed scientific work, but must constantly descend into the arena of world events, in order to join in the battle of conflicting passions and opinions...
For this reason the psychologist cannot avoid coming to grips with contemporary history, even if his very soul shrinks from the political uproar, the lying propaganda, and the jarring speeches of the demagogues.

It is in this spirit I have written The Hero and His Shadow: Psychopolitical Aspects of Myth and Reality in Israel, and Requiem: A Tale of Exile and Return. I also relate to this in 'The Cultural Psyche: From Ancestral Roots to Postmodern Routes,' in the the soon forthcoming volume Turbulent Times, Creative Minds: Erich Neumann and C.G. Jung in Relationship (eds. Erel Shalit & Murray Stein). Another recent book well worth mentioning is A Clear and Present Danger: Narcissism in the Era of Donald Trump, edited by Leonard Cruz & Steven Buser.




The Hero and His Shadow: Psychopolitical Aspects of Myth and Reality in Israel introduces a psychological perspective on the history, development, and myths of modern Israel.

The realization of Zionism relied on the pioneer, who revolted against the Way of the Father and sought spiritual redemption through the revival of Mother Earth in the ancient land. Myth and history, psyche and matter are constantly intertwined in the birth and development of Israel, for example when in the Declaration of Independence we are told that pioneers make deserts bloom, the text actually says they make spirits blossom.

Pioneer, guardsman and then warrior were admired hero-ideals. However, in the shadow of the hero and the guiding myths of revolt, redemption, strength and identity-change, are feelings of despair, doubt, weakness and fear.  Within renewal, lurks the threat of annihilation.

Suppressed aspects of past and present myths, which linger in the shadow, are exposed. Psychological consequences of Israel’s wars, from independence to the present war of terror, are explored on a personal note and from a psychoanalytic perspective. Shadow aspects of the conflicting guiding myths Peace and Greater Israel are examined, as well as mythical connections, such as between Jerusalem and the respective archetypal images of Wholeness and Satan.


Elizabeth Clark-Stern writes:
Psychiatrist Carl Jung wrote in The Red Book of the distinction between “The Spirit of the Times” and “The Spirit of the Depths”. We see this vividly demonstrated when we put Ari Shavit’s acclaimed new book My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel alongside Erel Shalit’s classic work, The Hero and His Shadow: Psychopolitical Aspects of Myth and Reality in Israel. The former takes us through the history of the heroic creation of Israel, including the darkest “shadow” behaviors of the Jewish state in the 1948 massacre of the Arabs of Lydda.
In the latter work, Erel Shalit tells us why.
This is no simplistic psychological analysis. The brilliance of this Israeli Jungian analyst is that he offers no easy solutions, plumbing the paradox of the necessary heroic identity of the Jewish state, and yet, around every corner is the shadow of every hero: the beggar, the frightened one, the part of all of us that is dependent on forces outside of our control.
It is also very important to note that Erel Shalit’s book is fascinating reading for anyone interested in the inner workings of the soul. On one level Israel is the backdrop for the author to explore how shadow, myth, and projection work in all of us, regardless of our life circumstance, nationality, environment, or history. It even includes a comprehensive glossary of Jungian terms that has some of the best definitions I have ever encountered, and hence a find for readers new to Jung.
And, of course, for people who are fascinated by the scope and depth of the story of Israel, this is a simply great read. It stands alone, but read as a companion to Ari Shavit’s My Promised Land, Erel Shalit’s Hero and His Shadow gives us The Spirit of the Depths in all its dimension. We may not be able to resolve the Arab/Israeli conflict, but we can learn many things from this brave, complex Israeli author, that we can apply to healing the inner and outer wars in our own lives.



Requiem returns us to an eternal theme, a dialogue with Soul, and we know quite well what happens when one dialogues with Soul—we change, consciousness is enlarged, the impossible becomes possible and we no longer are compelled to blindly follow in the deathly path of our forefathers.

Requiem is a fictitious account of a scenario played out in the mind of many Israelis, pertaining to existential reflections and apocalyptic fears, but then, as well, the hope and commitment that arise from the abyss of trepidation. While set in Israel sometime in the present, it is a story that reaches into the timelessness of history, weaving discussions with Heine and Kafka into a tale of universal implications.

Artist Junko Chodes writes:

From the first pages of this book, the tone of a masterpiece emerges powerfully.
This book makes us realize that the "Israel problem" cannot be understood in a journalistic frame of mind. Politics, war, land, culture, and contemporary experience are expressions of the deep core of human life, the core of the human soul.
This is an important book for anyone who thinks about "cultural identity" and the love of one's own country and culture.


  

Friday, August 12, 2016

Pictures from the Symposium "Creative Minds in Dialogue"

The symposium was held June 24-26, 2016 at Pacifica Institute in Santa Barbara, featuring internationally acclaimed speakers, including Riccardo Bernardini, Lionel Corbett, Nancy Furlotti, Ann Lammers, Lance Owens, Rina Porat, Susan Rowland, Erel Shalit, Evan Lansing Smith, Murray Stein and Steve Zemmelman.


The symposium celebrated the unique contributions of Jung and Neumann, with original presentations on topics ranging from creativity, art, Jung/Neumann and their impact on culture and the post-modern world, to anima and the great mother, and God, good and evil.

Here are some photo-memories. Photos by Amy Katz, courtesy of Pacifica Graduate Institute.

Speakers at the symposium
Erel Shalit




Ann Lammers

Joe Cambray

Lance Owens and Rina Porat

Evans Lans Smith

Lionel Corbett

Nancy Furlotti

Neumann Paintings




Riccardo Bernardini


Steve Aiuzenstadt

Erel Shalit
Heidi Townshend