Saturday, April 18, 2015

Jung Neumann Letters Conference April 24-26, 2015

Official launch of
The Jung-Neumann Letters
An International Conference in Celebration of a Creative Relationship


Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015, Conference Website Trailer Face Book

In just a few days we will be welcoming the many who join us in the Jung-Neumann Celebration of their creative relationship. Having read many of the contributions, I know that they are of tremendous interest, bringing the speakers' creativity, heart and mind; this will be an exceptional treat, spanning many different aspects and fields of analytical psychology - Culture, history, religion, clinic, and much more.


Many have pre-ordered the boxes of unique drawings by Erich Neumann. We are producing an additional number, so that there will be sets available during the conference.



Looking forward to seeing you in Kibbutz Shefayim!

Erel Shalit • Murray Stein • Batya Brosch • Tamar Kron 
Henry Abramovitch • Yehuda Abramovitch • Avi Baumann


Monday, April 13, 2015

עופר אדרת: "צלה של הנפש הציונית" על ההתכתבות בין יונג לנוימן, הארץ, 13 באפריל, 2015


 Official launch of
The Jung-Neumann Letters
An International Conference in Celebration of a Creative Relationship


Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015, Conference Website Trailer Face Book
Ofer Aderet writes in Haaretz about the Jung Neumann Correspondence, and the conference
עופר אדרת: כתבה ב'הארץ' על התכתבות יונג נוימן, ועל הכנס שיתקיים בשפיים
ניתן לקרוא את הכתבה בגרסת האינטרנט  



Tuesday, April 7, 2015

The Jung-Neumann Conference, April 24-26

The Jung-Neumann Letters
An International Conference in Celebration of a Creative Relationship


Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015, Conference Website Trailer
Follow updates on FaceBook

More than 250 attendees from 25 countries will take part in the Jung-Neumann Conference at Kibbutz Shefayim, north of Tel Aviv, April 24-26.

A year (or more) of preparations are now in their final stages, lecturers have prepared very interesting talks, rehearsals for Saturday night's performance are under way. Soon suitcases are being packed, posters put up, rooms inspected, and many are in the midst of reading the letters. 

The spirit of Jung and Neumann will be present in what arises from the springs of their creativity, and the depth of their reflections.

In December 1951, Neumann writes, "If one loves people beyond their qualities, how could God’s love, which is also supposed to exist beyond his qualities, become conscious in any other way than by God seeming terrible? … how could it be accomplished in any other way than with the help from Satan?" 

And a month later, Jung responds, "God himself is a contradictio in adjecto, therefore he requires the human being in order to become whole. Sophia is always one step ahead, the demiurge always one step behind. God is an affliction that man should cure."

And on it goes, in a dialogue that we shall take part in, and possibly carry onwards.

For the exciting program, see the conference website. We are looking forward to greeting you at Shefayim!

Erel Shalit


 The Conference is sponsored by
The Swiss Embassy in Israel
Princeton University Press
FAJP
Recollections

Digital Fusion

The Philemon Foundation
Israel Institute of Analytical Psychology
International Association of Analytical Psychology
together with the Jung Foundation and the Neumann Heirs


The Jung Neumann Letters Conference
International Advisory Board
Erel Shalit • Murray Stein • Batya Brosh • John Beebe • Riccardo Bernardini
Jerome Bernstein • Ann Casement • Angela Connolly • Tom Kirsch • Patricia Michan
Joerg Rasche • Nancy Swift Furlotti • Luigi Zoja • Liliana Wahba


Monday, April 6, 2015

A tribute to Neve Tze'elim - a Jungian Neumannian Treatment Center

The Jung-Neumann Letters
An International Conference in Celebration of a Creative Relationship


Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015, Conference Website Trailer
Follow updates on FaceBook


Neve Tze'elim 
A treatment center based on Jungian and Neumannian Principles

This talk, by Rivka Lahav, will bring the story of "Neve Tze'elim", an institute for the long term treatment, development and education of emotionally disturbed children and teenagers, mostly from kibbutzim.

The children resided in Neve Tze'elim during the course of their treatment, and education, and eventually return back to their homes.

The founder and director of Neve Tze'elim was Marion Baderian, who studied with and was inspired by Erich Neumann, and who modeled and ran the institute - the “Maon” in Hebrew - in the spirit of the works of Erich Neumann.

In this talk I will focus on the structure and dynamics of Neve Tze'elim , and will try to convey the special spirit of the place, which worked as a unitary reality for the children, the workers and all that surround them.

Rivka Lahav is a clinical psychologist and Jungian analyst.  She worked for 12 years in " Neve Tzeelim", and 10 years in the mental clinic of "Ramat Chen". She is now in private practice.

Her talk is part of a session on 'Clinical Aspects of Neumann's Work':
Chair: Yehuda Abramovitch
Rina Porat: "The Distress Ego"
Batia Brosh: "'Do you hear my call?'" – Two aspects of the feminine: A clinical example of Neumann's theory"
Rivka Lahav: "Neve Zeelim: Treatment center based on Jungian and Neumannian Principles” Sunday, April 26, at the Jung Neumann Conference in Shefayim



The Conference is sponsored by

The Swiss Embassy in Israel
Princeton University Press
FAJP
Recollections
Digital Fusion
The Philemon Foundation
Israel Institute of Analytical Psychology
International Association of Analytical Psychology
together with the Jung Foundation and the Neumann Heirs


The Jung Neumann Letters Conference
International Advisory Board
Erel Shalit • Murray Stein • Batya Brosh • John Beebe • Riccardo Bernardini
Jerome Bernstein • Ann Casement • Angela Connolly • Tom Kirsch • Patricia Michan
Joerg Rasche • Nancy Swift Furlotti • Luigi Zoja • Liliana Wahba

Saturday, April 4, 2015

An excerpt from Requiem: A Tale of Exile and Return

The Binding of Isaac - Moshe Kastel
... “Is it not a common practice to this day for many a father to sacrifice their sons on the altar of this or that divine expectation, of one or another ideology or firm conviction?” Eli Shimeoni asked rhetorically, when suddenly he started to tremble, as he wondered if this was what he was doing to his children. Had he sacrificed them on the altar of his beliefs? Just to keep a mad project going? Just because he thought, there was value in keeping an ancient culture alive? Did not our national poet, Yehuda Amichai lament the death of Stalin – mourning the leader of a country that recognized the State of Israel, emperor of socialist equality, the victor over Nazism, rather than celebrating the death of the dictator, murderer of millions? How easily do we all fall prey to false believes, only in retrospect realizing how mad we were!

He wondered, if Abraham argued with Terah when he left his father’s house and went forth to the land unto which God would lead him? What doubts pounded in his heart when he put the burnt offering upon his son, for him to carry the wood, some say cross, of his own sacrifice? ... Without being asked, was little Isaac to carry the Lord of Hosts’ mighty struggle against Asherah, the goddess of the grove, on his shoulders? Was he to be sacrificed, bound to the mother of the morning star and the king of the evening, the mother of the twin brothers Shahar and Shalem – yes, Shalem, the Canaanite king-god and mythological founder of Ir-Shalem?

Is this the story of the Jews’ submission to the father, in which the instincts of the sons bend to the fathers’ discipline, with the rabbis as a Halakhic fortress cementing the power of God, the Father? ...

In some legends, he recalled, Satan tries to prevent Abraham from carrying out the sacrifice. In his role as adversary, instigating toward consciousness, Satan introduces some healthy doubt into what otherwise seems to be passive submission. But in Biblical reality, it is only when the angel calls upon Abraham not to slay his son, that he lowers his hand, and puts away the knife with which he was ready to sacrifice his beloved son. He has passed God’s test of devotion, and the ram is offered in place of Isaac.

But has he passed the human test of devotion?


Rembrandt

Friday, March 27, 2015

The Correspondence of Jung and Neumann reviewed in Publishers Weekly

Official launch of
The Jung-Neumann Letters
An International Conference in Celebration of a Creative Relationship


Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015, Conference Website Trailer
Follow updates on FaceBook

An excellent review in Publishers Weekly of

 Analytical Psychology in Exile:
The Correspondence of C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann        
Martin Liebscher, Editor,
Heather McCartney, Translator

                
                  
Erich Neumann’s place in the history of analytical psychology may finally find the positive reassessment it deserves via this collection of his correspondence with Carl Jung.

The letters run from 1933, when the two first met, to 1959, shortly before Neumann’s death in 1960. Neumann proves an able interlocutor of his famous correspondent, critically engaged with both theory and practice while thoughtfully reconsidering the relation of Jung’s thought to Jewish identity.

Editor Liebscher’s introduction sees Neumann’s theories as realigning familiar Jungian archetypes, in particular that of the Great Mother, which Neumann positions as a counterweight against the “Platonic-Christian hostility toward the body and sexuality.”

The correspondences also illuminate institutional politics among Jung’s disciples, exploring issues of anti-Semitism (of which Jung was accused) and Zionism (Neumann left Germany for Palestine in 1934). Perhaps most importantly, these letters allow us to see a mutually enriching exchange of ideas that formed a significant, though underappreciated, passage of intellectual history. This is essential reading for anyone interested in the theoretical origins of psychoanalysis. (Apr.)

Don’t miss this historical event!


Analytical Psychology in Exile: 
The Correspondence of C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann,
edited and with an introduction by Martin Liebscher,
is published in the Philemon Series by Princeton University Press.

The Jung Neumann Letters Conference
International Advisory Board

Erel Shalit • Murray Stein • Batya Brosh • John Beebe • Riccardo Bernardini
Jerome Bernstein • Ann Casement • Angela Connolly • Tom Kirsch • Patricia Michan
Joerg Rasche • Nancy Swift Furlotti • Luigi Zoja • Liliana Wahba



Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Days of Darkness


Published March 19, New York Times:

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s election victory will keep an extreme right-wing government in power in Israel. Having crushed the hopes for an open-minded, enlightened, peace-inclined alternative to his government, days of darkness lie ahead, as promised by his rejectionist and fear-inducing expressions during the campaign.

The small, fanatical settlements beyond the security fence not only prevent the Palestinians from building a viab...le national home (well, their leadership is not exactly angelic itself), but they also prevent the creative and industrious young Israelis from building their homes as well (unless they join the bandwagon to the settlements, or leave the country).

Labor (now the Zionist Union) has never been successful as an opposition party, seemingly not having reconciled with the fact that for nearly 40 years it has not dominated Israeli politics.

To kindle a light in the darkness, it needs to present an alternative of sanity and enlightenment, an alternative to the swamps of occupation, as a forceful and persistent opposition.

EREL SHALIT


An excerpt from Requiem: A Tale of Exile and RETURN (pp. 2-4)

He came to think of that abandoned town he once had visited, driving down there into the desert, driven primarily by an obsession to see and sense an external manifestation of his own feelings of abandonment, of being left behind. He had always believed that the barren land of the desert was better suited for expelling the scapegoat and abandoning the unfortunate than for the dreamers of divine prophecies and the growth of oases. The fata morganas were, indeed, fairy mirages, inverted illusions, unrelated to desert reality.

The young had left the desert town as soon as they could, leaving their unemployed and worn-out parents behind. Once the little kiosk at the small piazza at the center of town, with coffee, chairs and a lottery machine, had been like a Persian Palace of Hope, a real kūšk.

But the feathers of hope no longer circled the air, as if impatiently waiting to be followed by the lucky and daring ones, departing for the dream of a new life, a better future. No, the feathers had all fallen to the ground, the shaft had lost its barbs. Even the feathers had lost their hope. No longer projected into the future, hope had merely become a relic of Professor Shimeoni’s favorite tense, which he cynically ascribed the negligible value of a threepenny, the PPP, past perfect progressive – “they had had hope – had they not had?”

No one in town could any longer define that thing called hope. Unemployment pay had run out with the rusty water in the taps, wasted, dripping into the sand. On the pavement outside the kiosk, the formerly white, now turned gray chairs of aging plastic, had become orphaned. As the weed sprouted up between the cracks, it became clear that the sidewalks were no longer made for walking. Days of decay no longer took turns with nights of despair, because in despair, there is still some voice trying to call out, however futile. No, even despair had now become orphaned, replaced by an empty void of apathy. Among those who managed to escape, the void was often filled to the brink with restless guilt.

Yes, it was sad, he had thought at the time, as he felt the relief of getting out of the godforsaken town, hastily escaping north. Yet, it was part of global depopulation trends. But now, his sense that everybody had left was different. It felt total, and like desertification, it had crawled in from the periphery to consume the very center of life, people like him, the pillars of society, the salt of the land – those that may not be immune to tragedy, but who conquer the desert rather than surrender to nature.
(pp. 2-4)

The road is long and thorny, and much hard work will be necessary to clean the thorns, to lay the ground for the future.


A NECESSARY COMPANION TO Ari Shavit's
MY PROMISED LAND: THE TRIUMPH AND TRAGEDY OF ISRAEL
By Elizabeth Clark-Stern

Psychiatrist Carl Jung wrote in The Red Book of the distinction between “The Spirit of the Times” and “The Spirit of the Depths”. We see this vividly demonstrated when we put Ari Shavit’s acclaimed new book My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel alongside Erel Shalit’s classic work, The Hero and His Shadow: Psychopolitical Aspects of Myth and Reality in Israel. The former takes us through the history of the heroic creation of Israel, including the darkest “shadow” behaviors of the Jewish state in the 1948 massacre of the Arabs of Lydda.

In the latter work, Erel Shalit tells us why.

This is no simplistic psychological analysis. The brilliance of this Israeli Jungian analyst is that he offers no easy solutions, plumbing the paradox of the necessary heroic identity of the Jewish state, and yet, around every corner is the shadow of every hero: the beggar, the frightened one, the part of all of us that is dependent on forces outside of our control.

It is also very important to note that Erel Shalit’s book is fascinating reading for anyone interested in the inner workings of the soul. On one level Israel is the backdrop for the author to explore how shadow, myth, and projection work in all of us, regardless of our life circumstance, nationality, environment, or history. It even includes a comprehensive glossary of Jungian terms that has some of the best definitions I have ever encountered, and hence a find for readers new to Jung.

And, of course, for people who are fascinated by the scope and depth of the story of Israel, this is a simply great read. It stands alone, but read as a companion to Ari Shavit’s My Promised Land, Erel Shalit’s Hero and His Shadow gives us The Spirit of the Depths in all its dimension. We may not be able to resolve the Arab/Israeli conflict, but we can learn many things from this brave, complex Israeli author, that we can apply to healing the inner and outer wars in our own lives.