Saturday, February 21, 2015

The Jung - Neumann Letters – An Editor's Perspective

Official launch of
The Jung-Neumann Letters
An International Conference in Celebration of a Creative Relationship


Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015, Conference Website Trailer
Follow updates on FaceBook

You are invited to hear
The story of the Jung Neumann Correspondence
directly from the Editor


Martin Liebscher will present
The Editor's Perspective
followed by a comparison of
The Jung-Neumann Letters and the Jung-Kirsch Letters
in which Martin Liebscher and Ann Lammers, editor of the Jung-Kirsch Letters, will present and discuss the two correspondences. The discussion will be moderated by Murray Stein. 


In his presenation Dr. Liebscher will introduce the main topics of the correspondence between Jung and Neumann. Whereas the letters of the pre-war years (1934-1940) were mainly concerned with Neumann’s attempt to engage Jung in a debate about his understanding of Judaism and Jewish mysticism, the correspondence after 1945 give an insight into the institutionalisation of Jungian psychology and the rivalries amongst Jung’s followers in Zurich which threatened to marginalise the works of outsiders like Neumann.

Following Martin Liebscher’s discussion of the Jung-Neumann and the Neumann-Kirsch relationships, Dr. Lammers will talk about James Kirsch’s discipleship with Jung and his somewhat prickly sibling relationship with Neumann. She will explore the contrasts between Kirsch’s and Neumann’s reactions to Jung during the 1930s, when Jung’s understanding, regarding both German nationalism and Judaism, was in a process of such rapid growth. Kirsch and Neumann served as two of Jung’s primary critics and teachers in this period, but with striking differences. Now that both correspondences are published, one sees how truly Jung respected these Jewish followers, while responding to each of them in profoundly individual ways. Although Jung certainly loved Kirsch as a friend and colleague, Neumann’s more forthright criticism may, paradoxically, have led Jung to trust him more fully.

Dr. Martin Liebscher is Senior Research Fellow at the German Department and Honorary Senior Lecturer at the Centre for the History of Psychological Disciplines at University College London, as well as Philemon Editor of the works of C.G. Jung. His publications include Thinking the Unconscious. Nineteenth Century German Thought (2010) and Libido und Wille zur Macht. C.G. Jungs Auseinandersetzung mit Nietzsche (2012). He is the editor of the correspondence between C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann (2015) and Jung’s ETH lectures.

Ann Conrad Lammers earned her Master of Divinity at The General Theological Seminary and her doctorate at Yale. After her first book, In God’s Shadow: The Collaboration of Victor White and C. G. Jung (Paulist, 1994), she edited The Jung-White Letters (Routledge, 2007). She later edited and co-translated The Jung-Kirsch Letters (Routledge, 2011), whose German edition has recently appeared (Patmos, 2014). She is a Jungian psychotherapist in southern New Hampshire.

Don’t miss this historical event!


Analytical Psychology in Exile: 
The Correspondence of C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann,
edited and with an introduction by Martin Liebscher,
will be published in the Philemon Series by Princeton University Press.

Conference attendees will be the very first to purchase and receive copies of the Correspondence,
at a 20% discount by Princeton University Press. After registration, a promotion code is sent to participants.


The Jung Neumann Letters Conference
International Advisory Board

Erel Shalit • Murray Stein • Batya Brosh • John Beebe • Riccardo Bernardini
Jerome Bernstein • Ann Casement • Angela Connolly • Tom Kirsch • Patricia Michan
Joerg Rasche • Nancy Swift Furlotti • Luigi Zoja • Liliana Wahba



Friday, February 13, 2015

Recollection and Recollectivization - a lecture by Erel Shalit



Friday February 13, 2015 at 7:15 pm
A lecture by Erel Shalit at the Park Hill Congregational Church (U.C.C.) 
at 2600 Leyden Street in Denver
for more information, here

Recollection and Recollectivization
The Transient Personality in Search of Memory

On the dark, shadowy side of the postmodern condition, we stumble upon transiency and fragmentation, alienation and rootlessness.

In this lecture, I will look at ‘the never guilty mass man’, of the post-modern condition, related to Erich Neumann’s concept of recollectivization.

Particularly, we may observe the relationship between the individual and the fragmented group, which constellates as transient crowd formation. In the condition of recollectivization, ego and consciousness are lost in the group, however, in a way strikingly different from the early state of oneness with the group.


Recollection serves as an antidote to recollectivization, and may show us “how we should act when the libido gets blocked” (CW 5). A smell and a fragrance, a subtle taste “of a cake dipped in tea,” as Proust says, re-calling a childhood memory, a lost time, a forgotten era, and the recollection of ancient wisdom and the ancestors, may provide the individual, as well as the group, with an anchor across the boundaries of time, by means of linking back to past heritage, and serving as a bridge to future developments. Thus, recollection is a central aspect of the conscious, explored life.


Erel Shalit is a Jungian psychoanalyst in Tel Aviv, past President of the Israel Society of Analytical Psychology, and founding Director of the Jungian Analytical Psychotherapy Program at Bar Ilan University. He is the author of several books, and chair of the forthcoming Jung Neumann Letters Conference, April 24-26, 2015.

Monday, January 26, 2015

A Dramatic Reading of the Jung Neumann Letters

Official launch of
The Jung-Neumann Letters
An International Conference in Celebration of a Creative Relationship


Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015, Conference Website Trailer

You are invited to 
A dramatic reading of The Jung Neumann Letters
with Dariane Pictet giving Voice to the Feminine 

Following the success of previous performances,
Dariane, John, Paul and Murray
will, in a unique performance, read selections from the Jung Neumann Letters 

Narrator: Murray Stein


Paul Brutsche as Jung


John Hill as Neumann

 

Dariane Pictet
Where: Kibbutz Shefayim Auditorium

When: April 25, 2015, at 19:30

Murray Stein, Ph.D. was president of the International Association for Analytical Psychology (IAAP) from 2001 to 2004 and President of The International School of Analytical Psychology in Zurich (ISAP-Zurich) from 2008-2012. He is the author of Minding the Self and of many other books and articles on Analytical Psychology and Jungian Psychoanalysis. He lives in Switzerland and is a training and supervising analyst with ISAP-Zurich. Website: www.murraystein.com.

John Hill, MA, received his degrees in philosophy at the University of Dublin and the Catholic University of America. He trained at the C.G. Jung Institute Zurich, has practiced as a Jungian analyst since 1973, and is a Training Analyst at ISAPZürich. His publications include: The Association Experiment, Celtic Myth, James Joyce, Dreams and Christian Mysticism. He has recently published his first book: At Home in the World: Sounds and Symmetries of Belonging.

Paul Brutsche was born in 1943 in Basel Switzerland. He studied philosophy and psychology, and received his PhD in Philosophy from the University of Zurich. He is a former President of the Swiss Society of Analytical Psychology, of the C.G.Jung Institute Zürich and of ISAPZURICH. He has lectured in Switzerland and abroad on picture interpretation, symbolism in art and questions of creativity.

Dariane Pictet has a degree in Comparative Religion from Columbia University. She trained in Analytical Psychology at the CG Jung Institute, Zurich and in Existential Psychotherapy at Regents College, London. She is a Training Analyst at the ISAPZurich, at IGAP and GAP in London. Publications include: Rumi: Poet of the Heart. Kali, the Hindu Goddess of Creation and Destruction. Compassion in Buddhism. An Exploration Of Silence in Christian Mysticism, in the Jungian Odyssey Series.

Don’t miss this historical event!


Analytical Psychology in Exile: 
The Correspondence of C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann,
edited and with an introduction by Martin Liebscher,
will be published in the Philemon Series by Princeton University Press.

Conference attendees will be the very first to purchase and receive copies of the Correspondence,
at a special, large discount by Princeton University Press.


The Jung Neumann Letters Conference
International Advisory Board

Erel Shalit • Murray Stein • Batya Brosh • John Beebe • Riccardo Bernardini
Jerome Bernstein • Ann Casement • Angela Connolly • Tom Kirsch • Patricia Michan
Joerg Rasche • Nancy Swift Furlotti • Luigi Zoja • Liliana Wahba

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Neumann at Eranos

Official launch of
The Jung-Neumann Letters
An International Conference in Celebration of a Creative Relationship


Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015, Conference Website Trailer
Follow updates on FaceBook

Dr. Riccardo Bernardini will present


Neumann at Eranos

Copyright Eranos Foundation Archives, Ascona

The ancient Greek word, “Eranos,” means a “banquet,” held thanks to the contributions liberally offered by the table companions. Eranos was a project of Olga-Fröbe Kapteyn’s (1881–1962), which came into being at Ascona-Moscia, Switzerland, in 1933—a “place of encounter and experience” or a “free space for the spirit,” where Eastern and Western philosophies could meet. Eranos has brought together some of the most influential scholars of the 20th century. This pioneering endeavor of annual interdisciplinary Conferences (Tagungen) has been properly recognized as “one of the most creative cultural experiences in the modern Western world” and “one of the richest centers of intellectual and spiritual interchange known to our century.” Its influence has been documented in a number of fields of knowledge, ranging from psychology to the history of religions, from philosophy to Eastern studies, from theology to anthropology, from biology to physics.



Jung’s influence, in particular, was decisive for the development of Eranos. Thanks to him, the Conferences could be profitably directed towards the study of the archetypes, the basic patterns of the psychic life, whose “archaic” and “primitive” side seems to keep its features despite the evolutionary processes that take place over time. The Eranos gatherings were characterized in the years of Jung’s presence in Ascona mostly as a meeting and convergence of different paths of research, which had been conducted independently up until that point. Gradually, this encounter became an original and fertile interdisciplinary crossroad, above all in authors like Erich Neumann, Marie-Louise von Franz, and James Hillman. Neumann, in particular, was the first analytical psychologist to speak at Eranos after Jung. Eranos represented a real trait d’union between Jung and his pupil. Between 1948 and 1960, Neumann lectured at Eranos thirteen times, on topics as “The Mystic Man,” “The Moon and the Matriarchal Consciousness,” “The Psychological Meaning of Rite,” and “Art and Time,” among others. A further contribution of his appeared in a special Yearbook, published at the occasion of Jung’s seventieth birthday (1950). Neumann’s Eranos lectures can be seen as a theoretical and clinical attempt to develop a post-Jungian psychology.

In 1950, Neumann wrote to Olga Fröbe-Kapteyn, recalling his encounter with the Eranos Archive: “When I came back to Europe in 1947 for the first time after the World War and having being away for eleven years, I was sure that, after all that had happened to me, Europe would seem alien and disturbing. There was one place, however, where I found my initial foothold—a ground for myself, my way of life, my work—and that was in the Eranos Archive … For some years now I have been coming to Switzerland and to Europe, but strangely enough—or is it in fact so strange?—in truth, it is always to Ascona and to Eranos that I come.”


This presentation will retrace the steps of Neumann’s participation at Eranos from three main viewpoints: Neumann’s encounter with the Eranos and its Archive for Research in Symbolism; the meaning of Eranos for Neumann’s work and the meaning of Neumann’s work for Eranos; and, through some excerpts from the still unpublished Erich Neumann–Olga Fröbe-Kapteyn correspondence, his profound relationship with the Eranos’s founder. Thanks also to several unpublished photographs of Neumann at Eranos as well as to some sequences from the mostly unknown movie, belonging to the Eranos Archives, we will thus try to understand what Neumann meant when, for testifying the role that the Ascona gatherings played in his life and work, he described Eranos as “… inconspicuous and off the beaten track, and yet a navel of the world, a small link in the Golden Chain.”


Dr. Bernardini is Scientific Secretary of the Eranos Foundation, and has served as Adjunct Professor at Turin University. Among his written and edited books are Jung at Eranos, The Complex Psychology Project (2011), The Jung–Corbin Correspondence (2013), and Carl Gustav Jung’s The Solar Myths and Opicinus de Canistris. Notes of the Seminar Given at Eranos in 1943 (edited with Gian Piero Quaglino and Augusto Romano, 2014). He serves as Co-Editor of the Eranos Yearbooks series, together with Fabio Merlini, and of SpringA Journal of Archetype and Culture.


Don’t miss this historical event!


Analytical Psychology in Exile: 
The Correspondence of C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann,
edited and with an introduction by Martin Liebscher,
will be published in the Philemon Series by Princeton University Press.

Conference attendees will be the very first to purchase and receive copies of the Correspondence,
at a special, large discount by Princeton University Press.


The Jung Neumann Letters Conference
International Advisory Board

Erel Shalit • Murray Stein • Batya Brosh • John Beebe • Riccardo Bernardini
Jerome Bernstein • Ann Casement • Angela Connolly • Tom Kirsch • Patricia Michan
Joerg Rasche • Nancy Swift Furlotti • Luigi Zoja • Liliana Wahba



Friday, January 23, 2015

Jung at heart by Aviva Lori


Official launch of
The Jung-Neumann Letters
An International Conference in Celebration of a Creative Relationship


Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015, Conference Website Trailer
Follow updates on FaceBook

The following article appeared in Haaretz ten years ago, written by veteran journalist Aviva Lori.

Aviva was enthusiastic about the forthcoming Jung Neumann Correspondence Conference, which I had invited her to cover. Sadly, she did not live to see it materialize. She passed away in the fall, 2013.

Erich Neumann was born January 23, 1905 – 110 years ago.


Jung at heart by Aviva Lori 
Haaretz, January 28, 2005

Psychologist Erich Neumann - designated heir to the great Carl Jung - would have been 100 years old this week. Despite his renown abroad, Neumann lived in relative obscurity in Israel, enveloped in Tel Aviv's `yekke' culture. His two children recall his life and times

He received his patients in the dining room, she received hers in the bedroom. His arrived every hour on the hour, hers on the half-hour. The children's room, which was split in two by a cloth curtain, also served as the waiting room for his patients; his mother's room was the waiting room for her patients. Everything was conducted with the greatest possible discretion. It was inconceivable that his patients should encounter hers.

Tel Aviv in the 1930s was a small town, and the address, 1 Gordon Street, corner of Hayarkon, was familiar to all the yekkes (Jews of German origin) from Ben Yehuda Strasse. It was a place of pilgrimage. The first Jungian temple in the Holy Land, established by Erich Neumann and his wife, Julia. In addition to being a Jungian analyst herself, she was also a renowned expert in palmistry (also called chirology), proffering advice mainly to people undecided about which profession to enter. Thus the pure science of the mind cohabited with what was then considered luftgesheft, or even witchcraft.

Erich Neumann, who was considered one of the greatest psychological theoreticians of the 20th century, was the disciple and scientific heir of Carl Gustav Jung; he was anointed as such by Jung himself. Neumann's students in Israel and elsewhere view him as Jung's crown prince, who in certain areas even exceeded the monarch. At that time, though, in Little Tel Aviv, the cordial neighbor from 1 Gordon Street was known only to a handful of yekkes who, like him, had arrived from Berlin immediately after Hitler's accession to power.

If Neumann were alive, he would have celebrated his 100th birthday last Sunday. But Neumann died from cancer, in 1960, at the age of 55, and his followers and admirers had to make do with a symposium on his work, which was held this past weekend at Kibbutz Givat Haim Ihud. This summer, a conference in his memory will be held in Vienna on behalf of all the German-speaking countries.

"In my view, he is Jung's most important pupil," says Dr. Erel Shalit, a Jungian analyst, "certainly among the most important.”

Crossing paths

Erich Neumann was born in Berlin in 1905 to Edward, a flour merchant, and Zelma, a housewife. The youngest of three children, he had a sister, Lotte, and a brother, Franz. The family's economic situation was good, says Prof. Micha Neumann, Erich's son, a psychiatrist and lecturer at Tel Aviv University who specialized in Freudian psychoanalysis. The three children had German names, all three studied medicine and the family belonged to the Jewish stream that was liberated of all shackles of religion and tradition: Germans of the Mosaic faith. Erich was the only one who was drawn to Judaism. He was part of an intellectual circle whose members met to debate issues of culture, art and Judaism, too. 

Franz fought in World War I and was awarded the Iron Cross. There were no moral compunctions about the justness of the war; the Jews were patriots and loved Germany passionately. Micha Neumann recalls his mother telling him that "in school, during the war, they would all stand up and say, `May God punish England.'"

At the age of 16, Erich met Julia Blumenfeld, then 15 and a half. The meeting took place at a ballroom-dancing lesson. "My mother was active in a `Blue-White,' a Zionist youth movement," says Rali Loewenthal-Neumann, a psychologist and chirologist like her mother. "Her parents didn't like the idea and sent her to learn how to dance so she would become a bit more refined." Julia and Erich discovered that they liked the same artists and the same museums. They started seeing each other but split up after half a year. "Mother said they broke up because he was mentally more mature. She didn't elaborate, but maybe he expected more from her than she was capable of giving - after all, this was 1921," Loewenthal-Neumann says. When they broke up Erich gave her a parting gift: a book by Martin Buber with a dedication, "Our paths will cross again."

Four years later they indeed met again - at Neumann's initiative. Someone told him that Julia had become engaged and he rushed to her house. Loewenthal-Neumann: "The truth is that there was no talk of an engagement. The person in question was a friend, but Father quickly renewed the relationship. Three years later, in 1928, they were married, both aged 23."

Neumann, who was very much influenced by Freud and more especially by Jung, studied philosophy and psychology at the University of Erlangen, in Nuremberg, where he received a Ph.D. in philosophy, and went on to study medicine at Friedrich Wilhelm University in Berlin. Julia attended the University of Mannheim, where she studied special therapeutic methods for small children and went on to study special education in Berlin.

"I don't know what made Father study medicine - I never asked him," Micha Neumann says. "Maybe it was because both Freud and Jung were physicians, and psychologists didn't yet have a status of their own. He completed his medical studies, but didn't do an internship, because of the race laws. He received the degree from the university before his death; they found his papers and granted him the doctorate."

Micha was born in Berlin in 1932. A year later Erich and Julia decided to leave Germany and immigrate to Palestine. She later told her son how she would hide with the pram in stairwells and alleys to avoid the Nazi thugs who were then starting to run wild in the streets of Berlin. "I thought my father came to this country under my mother's influence," Micha notes, "but my sister told me that at the age of 19 he was registered in a Zionist movement."

The family went to Zurich, where for the first time Neumann, 28, met Jung, who was 30 years his senior. Their relationship began as master and apprentice and developed into tremendous mutual admiration and finally a bond of teacher and chosen heir. "I am certain that it was preceded by correspondence between them and that Father was familiar with Jung's theory," Loewenthal-Neumann says. "I know that he stayed on to work intensively with him that year and that this was the beginning of a deep and fruitful relationship between them, including extensive correspondence."

Julia and Micha Neumann went to Palestine in February 1934. Erich stayed in Zurich, undergoing analysis with Jung - a necessary condition to become an analyst - and joined his family in the summer. Julia underwent analysis with Jung's wife, Emma, and with Toni Wolff, a student and colleague of Jung. Among Julia's papers - she was killed in 1985, in a road accident - is a letter from Jung authorizing her to treat patients. "My mother was a Jungian analyst without a university degree," Loewenthal-Neumann says. "That was accepted in those days, and she was a very good analyst, too."

Great disappointment

The Neumanns found a place in Tel Aviv, initially on Syrkin Street, a minute from Ben Yehuda, and two years later moved to the Gordon Street apartment. The language spoken in the house was German. "Mother didn't know Hebrew," Loewenthal-Neumann recalls. "My father knew Hebrew. He read Haaretz and he had patients with whom he spoke Hebrew. He learned the language abroad. But he wrote only in German and then his works were translated into other languages."

Micha remembers asking his mother, as a boy, not to speak German outside. "But she didn't know Hebrew and she always went back to German. I remember that once we were on a bus and we were speaking German, and someone, probably a Holocaust survivor, started shouting at us, `How can you speak German here?'"

But it wasn't only the language that separated the Neumanns from the reality in Palestine. "Father thought he would come here and find all his good buddies from Berlin," Micha notes, "but instead he found a great many Poles, very simple people, artisans, builders, merchants, speculators, people of the Fourth Aliyah [wave of Jewish immigration, 1924-1931] - not idealists like those from the Second Aliyah [1904-1914]."

Disappointed at the encounter with Palestine, Neumann led an insular life, fraternizing almost exclusively with Berlin friends who had also immigrated. He concentrated on his psychoanalytical work and immersed himself in research and in ramified correspondence with Jung that lasted many years. Intellectually, he suffered from painful isolation, which drove him to yearn for Europe, even though he despised it.

"Under no circumstances did I come to Palestine with illusions," he wrote to Jung in 1934. "The situation here is very serious. The original forces, spiritual and idealistic, that built the country, the Labor movement core and the agricultural settlements, are being pushed back by an invasive wave of undiscerning business Jews, shortsighted egoists who came here because of an economic conjunction of events. Thus everything is growing ever more sharply in the direction of politicization which overshadows all the other horizons - is there here the danger of the development of Jewish fascism? The Jews as a people are boundlessly more stupid than I expected. Do not misunderstand me, I am not complaining about the Jews, I am only saying that this is the situation ... I can imagine that the situation here could be dangerous and reach the brink of the abyss."

Though disappointed with the human landscape, Neumann fell in love with the desert and wrote to Jung about it. The son of a Swiss clergyman and a pious Protestant, who believed powerfully in the bond with the land, Jung was pleased that Neumann's anima had struck roots in the soil.

"My father believed in the future of this country," Micha recalls. "He believed that only the second generation would strike roots here. On the other hand, he also wrote that if the Jews, who were always victims, acquired power and independence, there was a great danger that their repressed aggression and violence would be released and that terrible things would happen here, as in the case of the German nation, which was always obedient and disciplined, and look what happened to them."

What do you suppose he would say if he were alive now?

Neumann: "I wouldn't want him to be alive today, because he would certainly be very disappointed in what is happening here - the violence, the occupation, the anti-democracy."

Still, Neumann did not think of leaving. He felt that he was on the margins, somewhat detached from things, but he had no hesitations.

"Jung offered him the directorship of the Jungian Institute in Zurich," Loewenthal-Neumann explains, "and he was offered other things in Europe, too, but he never considered accepting the offers. It was clear to him that he was staying here. True, in his lifetime he was not well known in Israel, and maybe today, too, he is not as well known here as he is abroad."

In 1936, at the start of the three-year Arab Revolt, Neumann's parents came for a visit, to see how their son was getting along in the desert.

Micha: "My mother told me that they said, `The fact that you are crazy Zionists is fine, but at least let us take the boy to a safe place, home to Berlin.' But Mother, who remembered vividly the Nazis' torchlight processions and the nationalist songs with Jewish blood on the knife, told them that the idea was out of the question. A few months later I remember going with my parents to Switzerland. Mother and Father stayed there to work with Jung, and my grandparents came and took me to Berlin. I have memories from there, of the house of my parents. Then they brought me back and we returned to Palestine. From then until 1947 Father did not see Jung, they only corresponded."

A new Jewish culture

Erich Neumann's father died in 1937, from a brain hemorrhage, brought on by a savage beating from Nazis. His mother managed to flee to London, where her other son, Franz, was living; she immigrated to Israel after the war and lived with Micha and his wife, at 1 Gordon Street. Lotte, Erich's sister, who was a communist, had fled to France before the war.

In Palestine, Neumann continued to probe a subject that had always interested him - the place of the Jews in world culture - and the attempt, which intrigued him, to establish a new culture in the Land of Israel. "He said that the Jews, like yeast, always fermented other cultures," Micha notes, "and the time had come for them to enrich their own culture. He had a very dramatic correspondence with Jung on this subject. He asked Jung to interest himself in and study Jewish culture and history, as he had done with Indian culture. But Jung somehow did not study Jewish culture, only writing to my father that it was terribly interesting to see a European Jew like him trying to create a new culture in Palestine. Jung was pro-Zionist, in the sense that he saw the return of the Jews to their roots as very positive."

Did he encourage your father to immigrate to Palestine?

Neumann: "No, that is a myth that is heard here, but it's not true. On the contrary, he thought it was insane to leave Zurich and come to this forlorn place. The solitariness was perhaps why my father forged such a dependent relationship with Jung."

The severance from Europe during the years of World War II, owing to the lack of postal services, and the intellectual isolation, produced a period of creative efflorescence in which Neumann wrote his two most important works: "Depth Psychology and a New Ethic" and "The Origins and History of Consciousness."

In "Depth Psychology," Neumann developed a revolutionary idea in reaction to the Holocaust. He argued that Judeo-Christian morality represses evil, leading to horrific phenomena such as Nazism. Micha Neumann: "He said that every person has to accept the evil within him, not to cast it away and not to repress but to live with it, sometimes even to manifest it, and to pay the price of sorrow and guilt feelings. He send the book to Jung after communication was restored and Jung said it was extremely interesting.

"The second book he worked on at the time, `The Origins and History of Consciousness,' is large and heavy. He asked Jung to write the introduction, and Jung wrote back, `Neumann starts at the place I left off' - and thereby appointed him his intellectual heir. Jung encouraged my father, unlike Freud, who did not let Jung develop independently. Nevertheless, my father was bitter about him, saying he did not always protect him. He asked the Jungian Institute in Switzerland to publish his books, but they refused and Jung didn't put up much of a fight for him. On the other hand, Jung put him in touch with his publisher, who then published my father's books, too."
All told, Neumann wrote 11 books, dozens of articles and many essays in which he studied the works of Henry Moore, Kafka, Mozart and Leonardo da Vinci, among others. In the possession of his children are three unpublished manuscripts, interpretations of stories by Kafka and Hasidic tales. Neumann said these works were not fully rounded out and did not want them published. Julia, and afterward the children, honored his request. Today Micha says that if anyone wants to delve into the material and study it thoroughly, the family would not object to the works' publication.

'The witch'

The correspondence between Neumann and Jung was renewed after the war and they also met at least once a year. Erich and Julia traveled to Switzerland for lengthy stays centering around the Eranos intellectual conferences held since 1933 at Ascona, a Swiss resort. Neumann was first invited to attend in 1948, and afterward went every year until the day of his death, as a guest lecturer who was much in demand. "That accorded him prestige and recognition internationally," Micha Neumann notes.


Is he really considered Jung's most important follower?

"I don't know the name of any other student of Jung who is as famous as my father."

Julia was equally famous, in her way. More than a Jungian analyst, she was a palm reader. She studied under the German-born Julius Spier, the father of psycho-chirology, the study and classification of palm prints.

Says Micha Neumann: "When I am abroad and tell people I am Neumann's son I am treated with respect, whereas in Israel people barely know him, only students of the humanities and art history. On the other hand, I get much more respect here when I say that I am Julia's son. She treated and helped thousands of people in Israel. Myths have already sprung up - people tell me what she said to them and I am certain it's incorrect, because I know her and I saw how she worked. But the myths about her continue to live. I called her a witch."

Julia did not take offense at this. She invited him to sit with her and observe what she did. "She first asked people's permission. I was astounded by what I saw and heard. One day she was visited by Esther Streit Wurzel, before she became famous as a children's author. She was a teacher in Petah Tikva and wondering what to do with herself. My mother told her, `You should write. Your father surely wrote, too.' My mother knew nothing about them, she was cut off from what was happening here, and then it turned out that her father was the writer and critic Shlomo Streit. People meet me and say, `She changed my life.'"

The Jungian analyst Dvora Kuchinsky consulted with Julia in 1948. Then 23, she was working nights for a German-language Israeli paper, but wasn't sure that was where her true interest lay. "[Erich] Neumann received me," she relates. "I told him I felt bored, that I thought I was in the wrong profession and that I wanted to do something else. I asked him whether he thought I was suited for psychology - everyone wanted to study psychology then - and he said, `Go to my wife.' She was a Jungian psychoanalyst who did palmistry. Today it is very much accepted, more than graphology. It doesn't show the future, but it does reveal a person's character and qualities. Of course I didn't believe in it, but he told me, `It's not witchcraft and she is not a Gypsy, it is a very serious test.'

"Julia didn't know a thing about me," she continues, "and asked me why I had come to see her. I told her I didn't know which profession to enter. She asked me which one I wanted. I said I didn't know, so she wouldn't just endorse what I was thinking, and then she said, `Go and study psychology.'"

A house abuzz

Loewenthal-Neumann and her brother remember a house that was abuzz with people and parents who were always busy, closeted in their rooms or on long trips. Quiet and good manners were an integral element of their childhood. Loewenthal-Neumann found a letter from her father to Jung in which he complained about the difficulties of making a living. "In 1934 he wrote that he didn't have enough patients and therefore was compelled to give courses in the house."

Her brother remembers folding chairs stacked in the shower: "Once a week they would open the door that linked two rooms, and 30 or 40 people would enter. My father would give a talk, in German, about Judaism, about Jungian theory and about the new things he was writing about."

What was it like to grow up in a house where strangers were always coming and going?

Neumann: "Today it looks quite peculiar. We knew we were not allowed to make noise, and my friends knew they must not run wild. I hated it pretty much. I would close myself in my room [the half-room split into two by a curtain]. My sister was a lot more cultured and talked to everyone."

Loewenthal-Neumann: "I don't remember having a problem with that. I opened the door and ushered in the people. Some of them told me stories."

Did you grow up as yekkes or sabras?

Neumann: "Of course we were yekkes. We spoke German at home, in school more than half the class consisted of children who spoke German, and people spoke German on `Ben Yehuda Strasse.' I grew up as a full-fledged Israeli, but the spirit was yekke. In all senses, both the good and the not-so-good."

Even the summer heat waves did not affect the yekke spirit. Punctuality was punctiliously observed. One's word was one's bond. Respect to adults and to what is served you. Anyone who took too much and couldn't finish his food didn't get dessert. Food was not thrown out. A telephone, too, was a bourgeois luxury.

"To his dying day Father didn't agree to have a phone in the house," Loewenthal-Neumann says. "He didn't want people to call and cancel appointments. This way, he said, people would come personally and maybe would cancel less."

Forsaking the faith

Micha Neumann says that only as an adolescent did he dare rebel. A little. "I was a wild kid with unconventional opinions. When the two British sergeants were hung [in 1947, by the underground organization Etzel, in retaliation for the execution of three of its members by the British in Acre prison], my father was in shock. He couldn't understand how Jews could do something like that, and I said they were storm troops. He was stunned. `I come to this country and hear my son talking like a fascist,' he said."
The two children attended Shalva, a private elementary and high school. Micha Neumann says he wanted to be a psychologist from the age of 16. "I was curious to know what went on in those closed rooms," he says. He wanted to be a Jungian psychologist, but there was no institute in Israel where he could be trained, and his father encouraged him to move in the Freudian direction. "My father actually urged me to go into Freudian analysis. He said it was appropriate for young people who were establishing themselves. When I came to the Psychoanalytic Institute, they asked me, `How could you, the son of Neumann, Jung's student, come to us?' It was as though I had changed religion."

He went to Switzerland to study medicine with the aim of becoming a psychiatrist. Four years later, in 1956, when his sister also wanted to study in Zurich, he was compelled to return home: There wasn't enough money to pay for both of them to study abroad. Micha Neumann completed his medical studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem-Hadassah Medical School and started to work as a psychiatrist at Shalvata, a psychiatric hospital in Hod Hasharon. Eventually he became the hospital's director. Today he has a private practice which is strictly Freudian.

Rali Loewenthal-Neumann studied psychology in Zurich and returned to Israel in 1960, when her father died suddenly. She is also not a Jungian psychologist. Her expertise lies in treating children and parents. She learned chirology from her mother and this is now her main occupation. A widow, she lives in Jerusalem. Of her three children, the eldest son is a psychiatrist, the next son is an electronic engineer, and she also has a daughter who is in education. Micha is married and the father of two - a daughter who is a lawyer and a son who is an electronic engineer.

Erich Neumann died of kidney cancer. In the summer of 1960 he went to Europe to deliver a series of lectures and returned in a wheelchair. "His brother took him to a roentgenologist in England and he saw that the cancer had already spread. He told him to return to Israel quickly. My father understood, and within less than three months he died. The feeling was that he died at his peak. He was then beginning to be recognized around the world, thanks to his books, which were translated into many languages, including Japanese, Chinese and Croatian."

One of the other two books which, in addition to "Depth Psychology," have been translated into Hebrew is "Amor and Psyche," in which Neumann analyzes the legend of the love of the mortal princess Psyche for the son of Aphrodite, Amor (also known as Eros or Cupid), and through this explains the processes of feminine love.

Julia was almost 81 at the time of her death. The accident happened when she left the house one Sunday morning before work, to buy flowers. On the way back she was hit by a taxi and died within hours.

"She was terribly afraid that she would grow old and become a burden on us," Micha Neumann says today. "She asked me to promise her that if that happened I would help her die. I made the promise, but I'm not sure I would have kept it."

'A father figure'

The black hole in the relations between Jung and Neumann is anti-Semitism. In his letters to Neumann in the 1930s, Jung did not express shock at the Hitler phenomenon. On the contrary: He viewed National-Socialism as a revolutionary movement that was connected to the deepest roots of the ancient German people, roots partaking powerfully of blood and soil, as in Israel. Jung believed that connecting to these roots would engender a healthy, strong movement, which would enthrall the masses and provide the right balance for German super-intellectualism.

Micha Neumann: "[Jung] said it was impossible to dismiss the movement and Hitler, as they were the psychic embodiment of all the Germans. They had a German society of psychotherapists, which Jung agreed to head, throwing my father into shock. He asked Jung to publish articles against anti-Semitism, to dissociate himself from it, but Jung didn't do it."

How did they stay friends after that?

"There is a claim that every anti-Semite has his good Jew. Jung was not anti-Semitic at the personal level. He wrote to my father about all the help he gave to refugees, colleagues from Germany for whom he found work. But ideologically he was, of course, an anti-Semite."

Didn't your father feel guilty for remaining in contact with him?

"No, nor did my mother. I told them that I had begun to hear during my analysis that Jung was anti-Semitic, but my mother said it wasn't so, that all his assistants were Jewish and so were all his students. Both of them denied it and said it was Jung's `shadow' [a negative personality element, according to Jungians]. In one of his letters to Jung, Father wrote, `You are the only pure remnant that I still have from murderous Europe.' He saw Jung as a person of great stature, untainted and moral, to the end. He likened him to one of the 36 just men [in the Hasidic legend]. I didn't like it, but I understood his need to cling to Jung as a father figure in the intellectual desert. He wrote him, `I have no one here whom I can talk to and learn from. For me, you are the link to the Europe which has so disappointed me.'"

Gold from the depths

There are about 50 Jungian analysts in Israel. Four years ago they split into three different associations. The reason for the split was not ideological but psychological - it stemmed largely from personality clashes within the group. There is no dispute regarding the Neumanns, however: All agree that Jung was recognized in Israel thanks to them. There is also general agreement about Erich Neumann's importance as the heir and developer of Jung's theory at the international level.

Dr. Erel Shalit - whose book The Hero and his Shadow discusses psychopolitical aspects of myth and reality in Israel - says that Neumann's Depth Psychology and a New Ethic is one of the most important books written on psychopolitics. It has had a crucial influence."

Dr. Gadi Maoz, chief psychologist of the Jezreel Valley clinic and a lecturer in behavioral sciences at the Jezreel Valley Academic College, a student of Dvora Kuchinsky, is part of the third generation of the Jung-Neumann dynasty in Israel. Neumann, he says, was ahead of his time and was the precursor of the "New Age" in its deeper sense.

"He felt the malaise of Western society very strongly," Maoz explains, "and the need to find a balm for it. The sickness is a rational focusing on the conscious world and a denial of the unconscious and the psyche; it is the repression of whatever is not comfortable from consciousness. Neumann said we must dive into the sea of the unconscious and bring to the surface all the gold and treasures, including the collective ones, because they are the driving force of creativity. The emphasis is on not repressing, but on connecting to the forces latent in the unconscious, to hold a dialogue with them. He was talking in the late 1930s about processes that we started to talk about in the late 1990s."
Don’t miss this historical event!


Analytical Psychology in Exile:
The Correspondence of C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann,
edited and with an introduction by Martin Liebscher,
will be published in the Philemon Series by Princeton University Press.

Conference attendees will be the very first to purchase and receive copies of the Correspondence,
at a special, large discount by Princeton University Press.


The Jung Neumann Letters Conference
International Advisory Board

Erel Shalit • Murray Stein • Batya Brosh • John Beebe • Riccardo Bernardini
Jerome Bernstein • Ann Casement • Angela Connolly • Tom Kirsch • Patricia Michan
Joerg Rasche • Nancy Swift Furlotti • Luigi Zoja • Liliana Wahba

Thursday, January 15, 2015

Steve Zemmelman and Patricia Llosa lecturing at Bar Ilan

Steve Zemmelman and Patricia Llosa will deliver lectures, 
Monday April 27, 1-5pm, at Bar Ilan University, 
program for Jungian Psychotherapy.


Steve Zemmelman will present

The Initiatory Journey: Spirit of the Bear and the Soul of Man

The arc of human life progresses through a series of initiatory processes, creating and dissolving meaning as we move from birth and infantile dependence to maturity and death. These processes are highly charged moments when the individual is somewhere between what he or she once was and what he or she is becoming. This “betweenness” is the instant of transformation, whether in analysis or in life outside the consulting room. In such liminal experience, powerful and undefined energies reveal a portal into dimensions of subjectivity and encounters with figures in the unconscious that have the potential to change a life forever.

The Swiss psychiatrist, C.G. Jung, realized the central importance of initiation in the psychology of individuation, the cornerstone of his thinking. Through studies of the analytic process, as well as of development across the spans of geography and time, he was able to link the psychology of initiation to the objective psyche, social and cultural rites, and rituals. D.W. Winnicott, a psychoanalyst, also informed our understanding of the psychology of initiation through his elaboration of the concepts of potential space, transitional objects, and their role in infant development and the creation of culture. Further explorations of the initiation process are found in other fields, most notably anthropology.

This program will focus on the meaning and process of initiatory experience through a talk and slide show based on a trip through the Arctic wilderness, an exploration of the archetypes of initiation and the natural life and mythology of the bear.



Steve Zemmelman, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst and member of the C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco. Dr. Zemmelman is an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California at San Francisco and was a lecturer for many years in the School of Social Welfare at the University of California at Berkeley. He has a private practice of analysis and psychotherapy in Berkeley and San Francisco, and is the author of a number of papers addressing the issue of initiation.


The Dream Voyage of Lilli Gettinger

New York Jungian analyst Patricia Llosa will present and discuss for the first time her discovery of a remarkable art work by a hitherto unknown artist. The Dream Voyage of Lilli Gettinger consists of 233 chronological dream images in pastel, with texts, drawn and written in the 1970s.

Gettinger, like Erich Neumann, was a native of Berlin who fled Europe to escape the threat of Nazi persecution. Her dream voyage engages the refugee experience, survivor guilt, and issues of identity. It extends the creative process into the realm of the therapeutic, addressing her family trauma and the collective trauma of Jews in Germany in the 1930s. Gettinger’s dazzling archetypal Dream Voyage engages the redemptive power of the feminine in healing trauma—which makes it especially resonant with Erich Neumann’s own explorations of the subject.


Patricia Llosa is an analyst in private practice, based in New York City. A native of Peru, she earned her undergraduate degree from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and did graduate work at The School of Visual Arts and the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association in New York. She is a member of Marion Woodman's BodySoul Rhythms Leadership Training Program and serves on the Marion Woodman Foundation Board. She worked as an administrator and educator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art for the last 21 years, and is a member of NAAP’s Gradiva Awards Committee.

Don’t miss this historical event!


Analytical Psychology in Exile: 
The Correspondence of C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann,
edited and with an introduction by Martin Liebscher,
will be published in the Philemon Series by Princeton University Press.

Conference attendees will be the very first to purchase and receive copies of the Correspondence,
at a special, large discount by Princeton University Press.


The Jung Neumann Letters Conference
International Advisory Board

Erel Shalit • Murray Stein • Batya Brosh • John Beebe • Riccardo Bernardini
Jerome Bernstein • Ann Casement • Angela Connolly • Tom Kirsch • Patricia Michan
Joerg Rasche • Nancy Swift Furlotti • Luigi Zoja • Liliana Wahba



Monday, January 12, 2015

מתל-אביב לציריך ובחזרה: חליפת המכתבים בין קרל גוסטב יונג לאריך נוימן

Official launch of
The Jung-Neumann Letters
An International Conference in Celebration of a Creative Relationship


Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015, Conference Website Trailer
Follow updates on FaceBook 

מתל-אביב לציריך ובחזרה:

חליפת המכתבים בין קרל גוסטב יונג לאריך נוימן


 פרופ' תמר קרון

"האם אי אפשר לצייר את איוב כאב-טיפוס של האנושות הסובלת, ובעיקר כשמדובר בניתוח של מצב האנושות בעידן הזה.  אולם אז הצמצום (בחיבורך) רק במקרא איננו מובן, מתעוררת השאלה ... האם מדובר רק בדימוי האלוהי המערבי?... עבורי באופן אישי, זהו ספר נגד אלוהים אשר הסכים שששה מיליון מבני עמו יושמדו, שהרי איוב הוא גם ישראל." (מתוך מכתב תגובה של אריך נוימן על חיבורו של  ק.ג. יונג "התשובה לאיוב" , בתאריך 5.12.51)

 "אני מסכים באופן עקרוני עם 'מוסר חדש'.אולם אני מציע לבטא את הבעיה הזו באיזו שפה שונה משהו. הרי אין מדובר באמת  מוסר "חדש". הרוע הינו ותמיד יהיה זה אשר ידוע עליו כי אין לעשותו." (מתוך מכתב תגובה של ק.ג.יונג על חיבורו של אריך נוימן "פסיכולוגית מעמקים ומוסר חדש", בתאריך 3.6.1957)

 השנה 2015 היא שנת המאה ועשר להולדתו של אריך נוימן. בשנה זו תצא לאור, בתרגום לאנגלית,  חליפת המכתבים בינו לבין קרל גוסטב יונג, אשר החלה בשנת 1934 עם עלייתו של נוימן לארץ ישראל ונפסקה עם מותו בשנת 1960. חליפת מכתבים זו הכוללת כ-100 מכתבים היא בעלת משמעות רבה להבנת הקשר העמוק, המורכב והמפרה בין השניים: יונג, מייסד התורה האנליטית, מורה וידיד; ונוימן, מייסד החברה היונגיאנית בארץ, תלמיד וידיד, ובעל תרומה מקורית וחדשנית לתורה שייסד רבו. הקטעים הקצרים שהובאו בתחילת מאמר זה מעידים על אופי המכתבים: דיונים עמוקים, סוערים לעתים תכופות ומתעמתים, ועם זאת מלאי הערכה.

 אריך נוימן נולד בברלין בשנת 1905 ונפטר בתל-אביב בשנת 1960. בית גידולו היה בית יהודים חילוניים שהזדהו בעיקר  עם התרבות הגרמנית וכמעט ולא עם היהדות. אולם אריך נוימן עצמו נמשך ליהדות, קרא את מרטין בובר, ולמד באוניברסיטה בין השאר גם חסידות וקבלה. כשהיה בן 16 פגש את יוליה בלומנפלד, אשתו לעתיד. הם נפרדו כעבור חצי שנה, ונוימן נתן לה כמתנת פרידה את הספר "אור הגנוז", סיפורי חסידים שקיבץ מרטין בובר, וכתב בו הקדשה "דרכינו ייפגשו שנית". ארבע שנים לאחר מכן התחדש הקשר ביניהם והם נישאו בשנת 1928.

 אריך נוימן קיבל תואר דוקטור לפילוסופיה והמשיך ללמוד רפואה, אולם לא קיבל את התואר בשל חוקי הגזע הנאציים. עליית המשטר הנאצי דחפה את אריך ויוליה נוימן לעזוב את גרמניה, ובשנת 1932 יצאו עם בנם התינוק בדרך לארץ ישראל. בדרכם עצרו בציריך, שם פגש נוימן את יונג, המבוגר ממנו ב-30 שנה וכבר מוכר ומפורסם כמייסד תורת הנפש האנליטית.


למפגש הראשון עם יונג הביא נוימן חיבור שכתב על "המשפט" של קפקא. בחיבור זה שכתב עוד בטרם הכיר ממש את התורה היונגיאנית, תאר נוימן את החוק כישות טרנספרסונלית, ואת האדם המתנהל מולו כאילו היה החוק פרסונלי כדמות בלתי ממומשת, סובלת וחסרת משמעות. התביעה מטעם המשפט  היא קריאה לפגוש את הטרנספרסונלי, ובשפה היוגניאנית- להיכנס לאינדיבידואציה. נוימן פירסם חיבור זה רק 25  שנה מאוחר יותר. בכך חזר לאותה נקודת מפגש עם יונג עם אותם עקרונות אך מפותחים לכדי בנין תיאורטי ייחודי ועצמאי.

יונג התלהב מהחיבור הזה, וקיבל את נוימן בזרועות פתוחות. נוימן היה באנליזה אצל יונג במשך שנה, ולאחר מכן במפגשים מעטים כאשר נוימן הגיע לציריך. למרות שהיה קשר חזק בין נוימן ליונג, קשר אינטלקטואלי בעיקרו שהתבסס על מכתבים ועל פגישות פעם בשנה, שבזמן מלחמת העולם השניה נפסקו לגמרי, הרי הוא לא היה תחת ההשפעה הקרובה של יונג. האנליזה אצל יונג נמשכה שנה בלבד, ומבחינה חברתית נוימן התנתק מהקלוב הפסיכולוגי של ציריך. מסע ההתפתחות התיאורטית של נוימן ניזון גם מהמטען התרבותי שהביא עמו מהרקע הקודם לפגישתו עם יונג: רוח רפובליקת ויימר הנועזת והמהפכנית, השיטה הפנומנולוגית והקשר שלו לקבלה וחסידות שלמד באוניברסיטה.

ועם כל זאת היתה בין יונג ונוימן הערכה הדדית גדולה, ויש האומרים שיונג ראה בו את בחיר תלמידיו. יתכן ויחסו זה של יונג לנוימן עורר את קנאתם וזעמם של היונגיאנים חברי הקלוב הפסיכולוגי של ציריך, אשר סירבו להוציא לאור בהוצאת הספרים של הקלוב את ספריו החשובים של נוימן שנכתבו בהיותו בישראל.  למערכות היחסים והאירועים הללו יש הד בחליפת המכתבים בין יונג לנוימן, כמו גם לכלל היחסים המורכבים ביניהם.

משבר חמור ביחסי השניים ואשר עלול היה לשבור את הקשר ביניהם נבע מהתנהגותו של יונג בשנים הראשונות לעליית המשטר הנאצי. בשנת 1933 הסכים יונג לקבל את המינוי לנשיאות "החברה הרפואית הכללית הגרמנית לפסיכותרפיה" אשר היתה כבר תחת שליטת הנאצים בדמותו של מתיאס גרינג, דודנו של הרמן גרינג שהיה בעל תפקיד  בחברה הרפואית. יונג טען שקיבל על עצמו את הנשיאות על מנת להגן על פסיכותרפיסטים יהודים מפני רדיפות השלטון הנאצי. אולם בשנת 1934 התפרסם מאמר של גרינג הנ"ל בעתונה של החברה הרפואית לפסיכותרפיה אשר הילל את האידיאולוגיה הנאצית והשתמש בכתביו של יונג על הארכיטיפ הגרמני ועל הארכיטיפ היהודי על מנת להצדיק את עליונות הגזע הארי.  יונג לא יצא כנגד מאמר זה והשאלה האם מתוך נאיביות או מתוך רצונו להמשיך להגן על עמיתיו היהודיים, או שמא מתוך אנטישמיות כפשוטה,  עדיין בעינה.  בשנת 1934 כתב יונג עצמו מאמר על ההבדל בין הלא-מודע הארי לזה היהודי, מאמר בעל נימה אנטישמית ללא ספק. בשנת 1936 כתב יונג מאמר על האל ווטאן, האל הגרמני אשר הגרמנים "תפוסים" בו. בכך ראה יונג צדדים חיוביים עבור העם הגרמני, אם כי ציין גם את פוטנציאל ההרסנות, והוסיף כי רק גרמנים יכולים להבין זאת. אריך נוימן הגיב בחריפות על מאמר זה. רק מאוחר יותר כתב יונג מאמרים ובהם הסתיגויות חריפות מהנאצים ומעשיהם. באותן שנים גם עזר לפליטים יהודים.  אולם מלבד להודות בטעויותיו בשיחות אישיות גם עם חבריו היהודים , לא פירסם יונג אף פעם התנצלות  פומבית על התנהלותו בשנות עלית הנאצים לשלטון. 

למרות משבר זה ביחסיהם, אשר ניתן לו ביטוי בחליפת המכתבים, בהם אריך נוימן הגיב במכתבים כואבים וזועמים, נשאר הקשר העמוק ביניהם בעינו. יונג המשיך לראות בנוימן את בחיר תלמידיו והתפעל מהקשר של נוימן לארץ ולנופיה. לנוימן, שהיה מנותק מהסביבה החברתית בישראל, וחש מבודד הן מהתרבות האירופית בה צמח והן מהחוגים היונגיאניים,  היה הקשר האינטלקטואלי עם יונג משמעותי וחשוב. במשך מלחמת העולם השניה נותק קשר המכתבים בין יונג לנוימן. יתכן ודווקא בזכות הניתוק של נוימן, הן מהחברה הישראלית והן מהיונגיאנים באירופה, ואולי גם ניתוקו מיונג עצמו, הגיעה יצירתיותו לפריחה מדהימה. בשנת 1949 יצאו שניים מספריו החשובים לאור בגרמנית (נוימן כתב רק בגרמנית): "פסיכולוגית מעמקים ומוסר חדש" (יצא לאור בעברית בשנת 1969 בהוצאת שוקן), ו"מקורות ותולדות התודעה" אשר לא תורגם עדיין לעברית. נושא שנוימן עסק בו באינטנסיביות רבה היה פסיכולוגית המעמקים של האדם היהודי. נוימן כתב דפים רבים תחת כותרת זו, אך לא מסר את כתב היד לדפוס ולפרסום, כנראה משום שחשש שאינו בקי כל צרכו הן בשפה העברית והן בתחומי הידע שכתב עליהם. בחליפת המכתבים נמצאת גם התכתבות בה נוימן ביקש מיונג לחקור את תולדות ותרבות העם היהודי  מנקודת הראות של התורה האנליטית, אך יונג לא נענה  לכך, והביע התעניינות בנסיונו של נוימן להיות בין בוני תרבות חדשה בארץ ישראל.  

עוינותם כלפי נוימן של חברי המועדון הפסיכולוגי בציריך חוג היונגיאנים שסבב את יונג התבטאה בביקורת עליו ובסירובם להוציא את ספריו שהוזכרו לעיל בהוצאת הספרים של המועדון הפסיכולוגי. יונג לא יצא להגנתו של נוימן, ונוימן הביע אכזבתו מכך.  יונג מצא דרך אחרת לפתרון וקישר את נוימן למ"ול שהוציא את ספריו שלו.

בשנים שלאחר המלחמה הוסיף אריך נוימן לכתוב ולפרסם ספרים ומאמרים רבי ערך, ביניהם "האם הגדולה" (לא תורגם לעברית) שזכה לפרסום והכרה כחיבור רב משמעות על ארכיטיפ האם הגדולה ומקומו המרכזי בנפש האדם, ועל הופעתו בדת ובאמנות של תרבויות שונות בכל הזמנים. ספרו "אמור ופסיכה" העוסק בהתפתחותה של הנפש הנשית, זכה אף הוא לפרסום והכרה, ותורגם לעברית (נוימן, א. (1981). אפוליאוס-אמור ופסיכה; על ההתפתחות הנפשית של היסוד הנשי. תל אביב: ספרית פועלים).

אחרי המלחמה התחדש הקשר בין יונג לנוימן. הם המשיכו להתכתב ונפגשו לפחות פעם בשנה, הן בציריך מקום מושבו של יונג והן בכנסי "ארנוס" באסקונה. נוימן הוזמן לראשונה לכנס "ארנוס" בשנת 1948, בהמלצתו החמה של יונג.  החוג שנוימן היה מחובר אליו במשך 10 השנים האחרונות שלו  היה חוג "ארנוס", קהילה של אינטלקטואלים אירופאים ואנשי רוח ידועי שם מכל העולם. עמדתו של נוימן בחוג זה היתה למרכזית אחרי שיונג כבר לא היה פעיל שם. הרצאותיו בכנסי "ארנוס" התפרסמו כמאמרים ואוגדו בספרים שעיקר עניינם הוא האדם היצירתי, והקשר היצירתי שבין היחיד והעולם הסובב אותו ואשר הוא יוצר.  מאמרי ארנוס מהווים מכלול של חשיבה יצירתית על הנפש, המהווה גשר בין תפיסתו ההתפתחותית בה הוא מזוהה בדרך כלל, לבין תפיסה אנליטית-אקזיסטנציאליסטית מקורית.

חמישה ממאמרים אלה תורגמו לעברית ויצאו לאור: אריך נוימן, האדם המיסטי. (2007). תל אביב: רסלינג. תרגום: יואב

ספיר. עריכה מדעית: ד"ר אבי באומן . אריך נוימן, (2013). אדם ומשמעות; שלש מסות. תרגום ועריכה מדעית:  תמר קרון ודוד וילר. תל אביב: רסלינג.

 אריך נוימן נפטר תוך זמן קצר מאז התגלתה מחלת הסרטן בה חלה,  בהיותו בן 55, בתקופה בה החל להתפרסם מחוץ לישראל ולשווייץ וגרמניה. אולם עד היום עדיין לא זכה לפרסום לו הוא ראוי בזכות רעיונותיו המקוריים וחידושיו בתורה האנליטית-יונגיאנית. כתביו מהוים תרומה שמעבר לתחום הפסיכולוגיה בלבד להבנת מקורותיה של היצירתיות ושל התרבות,וביניהם מאמרים חשובים על אמנים וסופרים.

אף הקשר בין נוימן לבין יונג, אשר יש בו עומק, מורכבות והפרייה הדדית, אינו מוכר ומובן דיו. פרסומה של חליפת המכתבים, אשר מסיבות שונות עוכבה למשך שנים, תאיר היבטים משמעותיים בקשר הזה, והיא בבחינת אירוע בעל חשיבות רבה בתולדות הפסיכולוגיה האנליטית. המכתבים מקיפים נושאים תיאורטים, קליניים ותרבותיים כמו גם נושאים אישיים.  

לכבוד הוצאת חליפת המכתבים יתקיים כנס השקה בקיבוץ שפיים, בתאריכים 24-26 לאפריל 2015, יפגיש בין מרצים מרחבי העולם עם עמיתיהם מישראל. המרצים שהוזמנו לשאת דברים בכנס, יציגו גילויים חדשים הקשורים לחליפת המכתבים בין שני האישיים וליחסים ביניהם, וכמו כן נושאים שונים שהועלו על ידם בחליפת המכתבים. בין הנושאים:תרבות והיסטוריה, שאלת הרוע, האמן והאמנות, ומפגשי ארנוס .כמו כן יועלו זכרונות של אלה מאיתנו אשר הכירו את השניים, ובני שתי המשפחות.  

בנוסף לכך יעסוק הכנס בתרומתו היחודית ויקרת הערך של אריך נוימן לפסיכולוגיה האנליטית ולחקר  התרבות. תרומתו חוצה את הגבולות של הפסיכולוגיה האנליטית של יונג. אנשי אקדמיה ומטפלים יציגו את השקפותיו ומחשבותיו העדכניות של אריך נוימן הקשורות לנושאים קליניים שונים, כמו גם לאמנות ותרבות . הכנס מיועד
למטפלים ואנשי אקדמיה במדעי החברה והרוח מהעולם כולו וכן לקהל הרחב המתעניין בתרבות והומניסטיקה. 

 
תמר קרון היא פסיכולוגית קלינית ואנליטיקאית יונגיאנית. תמר היא פרופסור אמריטוס של האוניברסיטה העברית, ועומדת בראש המגמה לפסיכולוגיה קלינית במכללה האקדמית תל-אביב-יפו ומלמדת קורסים בפסיכותרפיה דינמית וסמינרים על פשר החלום. תחומי המחקר של תמר הם: חלומות (במצבי מעבר ובמצבי דחק וטראומה מתמשכת, חלומות של מטפלים על מטופלים, ועוד). תמר כתבה מאמרים, פרקים בספרים וספרים העוסקים בפסיכותרפיה והדרכה, בזוגיות, בחלומות, וכן במטאפסיכולוגיה של אריך נוימן. 


Analytical Psychology in Exile:
The Correspondence of C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann,
edited and with an introduction by Martin Liebscher,
will be published in the Philemon Series by Princeton University Press.

Conference attendees will be the very first to purchase and receive copies of the Correspondence,
at a special, large discount by Princeton University Press.


The Jung Neumann Letters Conference
International Advisory Board

Erel Shalit • Murray Stein • Batya Brosh • John Beebe • Riccardo Bernardini
Jerome Bernstein • Ann Casement • Angela Connolly • Tom Kirsch • Patricia Michan
Joerg Rasche • Nancy Swift Furlotti • Luigi Zoja • Liliana Wahba