Wednesday, December 30, 2015

The Cycle of Life: Themes and Tales of the Journey


The Goodreads Book Giveaway of The Cycle of Life finished on December 20. 755 people entered, and the winner has received her copy of the book - thank you for entering the Giveaway!

And thank you all who have read the book, bought it and given it as a gift, the very many who have commented so positively on the book, and all of you who keep buying and reading it - that is all a true gift to me.

Chapter 1, The Journey, opens with Cavafy's exceptional poem Ithaka:

As you set out for Ithaka
hope the voyage is a long one,
full of adventure, full of discovery.
Laistrygonians and Cyclops,
angry Poseidon—don’t be afraid of them:
you’ll never find things like that on your way
as long as you keep your thoughts raised high,
as long as a rare excitement
stirs your spirit and your body.
Laistrygonians and Cyclops,
wild Poseidon—you won’t encounter them
unless you bring them along inside your soul,
unless your soul sets them up in front of you.

Hope the voyage is a long one.
May there be many a summer morning when,
with what pleasure, what joy,
you come into harbors seen for the first time;
may you stop at Phoenician trading stations
to buy fine things,
mother of pearl and coral, amber and ebony,
sensual perfume of every kind—
as many sensual perfumes as you can;
and may you visit many Egyptian cities
to gather stores of knowledge from their scholars.

Keep Ithaka always in your mind.
Arriving there is what you are destined for.
But do not hurry the journey at all.
Better if it lasts for years,
so you are old by the time you reach the island,
wealthy with all you have gained on the way,
not expecting Ithaka to make you rich.

Ithaka gave you the marvelous journey.
Without her you would not have set out.
She has nothing left to give you now.

And if you find her poor, Ithaka won’t have fooled you.
Wise as you will have become, so full of experience,
you will have understood by then what these Ithakas mean.

Constantine Petrou Cavafy

Steve Zemmelman writes in Containing the light, in Spring Journal, 2015:

In The Cycle of Life: Themes and Tales of the Journey, Shalit places Jung’s conceptualization of the transformations of consciousness over the life span alongside life cycle theories, notably those of Eric Erikson and Daniel Levinson. He also places his ideas about the arc of life in relation to Greek myth (the three Morai who spin one’s fate – but not one’s destiny - at birth) as well as biblical, Talmudic and Hasidic tradition, the Hindu Ashramas or four stages of life, pre-Socratic Greek philosophy, Dante’s Divine Comedy and fairy tales.

Shalit’s amplifications of Jung’s work on understanding the life cycle are substantial. He outlines the developmental progression through the child, the puer/puella, the adult, and the senex. His talent for integration and creative thinking is evident in bringing to bear on Jung’s thinking various psychoanalytic theorists - notably Freud, Klein, and Winnicott – as well as myth, fairy tale, comparative religion, etymology and dream material.

Where this book shines is not in a dry recitation of the psychology of transition through life’s stages but in the sense of wonder and mystery Shalit is able to articulate in relation to the problems of life all along the journey.

Erel Shalit’s books reflect his skill and experience as a clinician and thinker in the Jungian tradition who is making a major contribution to the body of psychological thinking in general and Jungian theory in particular.


Thursday, November 26, 2015

The Human Soul: Lost in Transition at the Dawn of a New Era - audio recording


with Dr. Erel Shalit

A Public Event on the Pacifica Institute Ladera Lane Campus, Barrett Center
Thursday, November 12th from 7:15 – 9:00 p.m.

An audio recording of the lecture is now available here, beginning with Joe Cambray's introduction.

The post-modern condition is characterized by a multitude of perspectives and narratives, challenging the view and the value of central, universal truths. The changes generated by this existential condition affect the individual as well as society, the experience of interiority as well as the perception of external reality. In cyberspace, the internal and the external sometimes converge, persona and shadow may merge, and the ego's sense of identity may become detached from its roots in the Self.

The lecture will present these developments, including the Transient Personality, who traverses time, space, narratives and a plenitude of faces at great ease, but does not stay in one place either in external reality, or within him- or herself.

Dr. Erel Shalit is a Jungian psychoanalyst in Tel Aviv. He is a past President of the Israel Society of Analytical Psychology, founding Director of the Jungian Analytical Psychotherapy Program at Bar Ilan University, and past Director of the Shamai Davidson Community Mental Health Clinic, at the Shalvata Psychiatric Centre in Israel.

He is the author of several books, among them The Cycle of Life: Themes and Tales of the Journey; Enemy, Cripple & Beggar: Shadows in the Hero’s Path; The Complex: Path of Transformation from Archetype to Ego; The Hero and His Shadow: Psychopolitical Aspects of Myth and Reality in Israel, and the novella Requiem: A Tale of Exile and Return; and with Nancy Swift Furlotti, he has edited The Dream and its Amplification. Dr. Erel Shalit is also the editor of Jacob and Esau: On the Collective Symbolism of the Brother Motif, a previously unpublished book by Erich Neumann, and Turbulent Times, Creative Minds - Erich Neumann and C.G. Jung in Relationship, co-edited with Murray Stein, as well as the author of a forthcoming book on The Human Soul in Transition, at the Dawn of a New Era.

Last spring Dr. Shalit chaired the Jung-Neumann Conference, April 24-26, 2015 in kibbutz Shefayim, Israel.

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

The Night of Broken Glass, 75 years ago




77 years ago, on the night between November 9-10, 1938, pogroms took place during the so called Kristallnacht, in which more than 90 Jews were killed, 30,000 incarcerated in concentration camps, 1,000 synagogues were burned, thousands of Jewish business, schools, homes and buildings damaged and destroyed.

The following are excerpts from the novella Requiem: A Tale of Exile and Return:
Eliezer Shimeoni recalled the words of Chaim Potok, who so poignantly gave voice to that collective concern, “To be a Jew in this century is to understand fully the possibility of the end of mankind, while at the same time believing with certain faith that we will survive.” Living in Israel was certainly living at life’s edge, at the edge of survival.

Bitter irony turned into sour cynicism, as Professor Shimeoni reflected on the word “certain.” He was convinced that an eloquent writer such as Potok had purposefully used the ambiguous word certain. “Is there a word more uncertain than certain?” he asked himself rhetorically. “Did Potok mean that we could be sure, could be certain in our faith that we will survive, or did he mean that we may have some, a bit, perhaps a certain bit of faith that we will survive?” 
Eliezer Shimeoni did indeed have a certain, a very certain faith that the Jews would survive.
.... 
Had not the ordinary German, covering the gamut from willing collaborator to frightened compliant, been infected by years of indoctrination and selective information? “When I myself look into the mirror,” he said to himself, “it is somewhat embarrassing to admit that, perhaps, I may have wished Chamberlain success in his mission of appeasement. I have always had a soft spot for Neville Chamberlain. He pronounced himself to be ‘a man of peace to the depths of my soul,’ and I believed him, and I like to see myself as a man of peace to the depth of my soul.” ...

"Peace in our time"
And Professor Shimeoni, for one, would have made his way to Heston Airport and applauded him upon his return, because he is a man of hope and peace.
Thus, he told himself, “I cannot blame the passively collaborating German, and can only admire and feel a deep love for those who dared to see and those that dared to act.” Particularly he thought of Wickard von Bredow, as the example of exceptional heroism: As County Officer (Landrat), he received the order, November 9, 1938, to burn down the synagogue in the East Prussian town of Shirwindt, just like all the synagogues in Germany that were to be destroyed during the next few hours. Von Bredow put on his German Army uniform, said goodbye to his wife, and, ...
Eli Shimeoni wondered, “Would I have dared to trespass the prohibitions, would I have dared to buy from a Jewish store? I hope so, but the honesty that fears evoke, makes me wonder. If I would have been a 1938 German, may I not have looked the other way, avoiding the shame and the guilt gazing back at me in the store owner’s eyes of shattered glass.”

And he knew very well that pathology is always stronger and more powerful than sanity, just like hatred settles into scorched ground, while love forever remains aloft, like letters written in the clouds. Does not Father Death eventually swallow every one of Life’s Children? ...
@Howard Fox. http://howardfox.com

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

The Cycle of Life Book Giveaway

Enter for a chance to win a first edition paperback copy of THE CYCLE OF LIFE: THEMES AND TALES OF THE JOURNEY by Erel Shalit.

In the first half of life, the task of the young traveler is to depart from home, to step out into the world in search for his or her adventure, to find his or her own individual path. However, in the second half, we find ourselves on what often amounts to a very long journey in search of Home. In many a tale, the hero, for instance Gilgamesh, sets off on his road to find life's elixir, while other stories, such as the Odyssey, revolve around the hero's long and arduous journey home.

This archetypal journey of life is constantly repeated along the never-ending process of individuation. We find ourselves returning to this venture repeatedly, every night, as we set out on our nightly voyage into the landscape of our unconscious.

From the Bible to Shakespeare, to Carl Jung and to Erik Erikson, Erel Shalit's book, THE CYCLE OF LIFE poetically and informatively presents "the themes and tales of the journey". THE CYCLE OF LIFE received the Eric Hoffer Book Award Honors (in Culture), 2012.

Erel Shalit is a Jungian psychoanalyst in Ra’anana, Israel. He is the author of several publications, including Enemy, Cripple, Beggar: Shadows in the Hero’s Path, The Hero and His Shadow: Psychopolitical Aspects of Myth and Reality in Israel, The Complex: Path of Transformation from Archetype to Ego, and Requiem: A Tale of Exile and Return. With Nancy Furlotti, he co-edited The Dream and It’s Amplification, also a Fisher King Press publication. Dr. Shalit lectures at professional institutes, universities, and cultural forums in Israel, Europe, and the United States.

Click here to enter the book giveaway.

Saturday, October 10, 2015

Netanyahu – a leader with no vision, and without a message


As so many times in the past, Israel is again burning. Terror, clashes and violence, mostly instigated and carried out by Palestinians, sweep over the country, not only in the West Bank and Gaza, but in Israel proper.

And now we have instances of terror carried out by Jews as well, and we can not claim moral immunity.

Yes, true, terror by Jews is condemned by the absolute majority of Israelis, while much of Palestinian teror is received by praise by both Palestinian leadership and society. Still, far from what is necessary has been done to reign in those extremist elements in Israeli society, particularly in the more fanatical of the settlements and among certain national-religious groups.

While Netanyahu occasionally has been pressured to freeze settlements and other concessions, it has never been his initiative. Unfortunately, the Palestinian leadership has also never responded favorably to those concessions – for equally bad reasons: a lack of will and capability.

In his recent talk to the UN General Assembly, Netanyahu spoke well and truthfully. Yet, without any vision. He did not bring any message. Declaring his desire to renew negotiations without preconditions is not enough. His counterpart, Mahmoud Abbas, does not trust him, and is equally reluctant, since he cannot provide what is required – accepting a demilitarized Palestinian state alongside Israel without any further claims on the Jewish state.

Yet, stalemate inevitably leads to the eruption of violence (even movement does not guarantee peaceful relations – the terror instigated by the Palestinians during the Oslo negotiations should not be forgotten or denied).

However, Mahmoud Abbas, while perhaps tired and often threatening to resign, does move his separate agenda, to gain international recognition. While his moves are mainly on the international arena, they ignite the fire on the ground, not the least by incitement (such as “The Jews have no right to defile Al-Aqsa with their filthy feet”).

Netanyahu, however, has to be dragged, sometimes into the right acts. His present reluctance to expand construction of settlements, and in fact enforcing a construction freeze, is helpful.

Even more helpful would be a comprehensive initiative. Considering the locked situation, the first issue on the agenda would be unilateral withdrawal from civilian occupation.

First, Israel would need to define a temporary border. In fact, the notorious security fence does this quite well; 9-13% of the West Bank remains west of the fence. That is, 87-90% of the West Bank remains outside the security fence, to establish a demilitarized Palestinian state with temporary, but near-complete borders.

© Shaul Arieli, http://www.shaularieli.com

Secondly, separate between civilian and military occupation:
a. Withdrawal from civilian occupation beyond the self-defined temporary border, and beyond the big settlement blocs; i.e., from close to 90% of the West Bank. Relocate the many small and scattered settlements - in which a minority of settlers reside, to inside the security fence, i.e., the self-defined, temporary but distinct border, preferably by offering compensation for voluntary relocation.

b. Retain military occupation for security needs, but step by step, increase the territory handed over to Palestinian civilian authority – and eventually, as well, security control. Practical and creative solutions to ensure security cooperation can be provided – some are already implemented. Each limited territorial step, as part of a long range plan, should be accompanied by steps of mutuality, agreed upon by both sides. If no agreement, no military withdrawal, until security control can be transferred. 
c. That is, unilateral civilian disengagement and withdrawal from occupied territories beyond thesecurity fence, but negotiated step-by-step military withdrawal, with increased Palestinian security responsibility in those areas added to its sovereign territory.
Thirdly, in the long run, in order to ensure viability, low-level confederative frameworks of cooperation, can be conducive, encompassing Gaza-Israel-West Bank/Palestinian Authority-Jordan.

The critical issue at this time is withdrawal from civilian occupation beyond the big settlement blocs (located along the cease-fire lines), while incremental withdrawal from military occupation can only take place when agreements are reached.



A NECESSARY COMPANION TO Ari Shavit's MY PROMISED LAND

By Elizabeth Clark-Stern

Psychiatrist Carl Jung wrote in The Red Book of the distinction between “The Spirit of the Times” and “The Spirit of the Depths.” We see this vividly demonstrated when we put Ari Shavit’s acclaimed new book My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel alongside Erel Shalit’s classic work, The Hero and His Shadow: Psychopolitical Aspects of Myth and Reality in Israel. The former takes us through the history of the heroic creation of Israel, including the darkest “shadow” behaviors of the Jewish state in the 1948 massacre of the Arabs of Lydda.
In the latter work, Erel Shalit tells us why.

This is no simplistic psychological analysis. The brilliance of this Israeli Jungian analyst is that he offers no easy solutions, plumbing the paradox of the necessary heroic identity of the Jewish state, and yet, around every corner is the shadow of every hero: the beggar, the frightened one, the part of all of us that is dependent on forces outside of our control.

It is also very important to note that Erel Shalit’s book is fascinating reading for anyone interested in the inner workings of the soul. On one level Israel is the backdrop for the author to explore how shadow, myth, and projection work in all of us, regardless of our life circumstance, nationality, environment, or history. It even includes a comprehensive glossary of Jungian terms that has some of the best definitions I have ever encountered, and hence a find for readers new to Jung.

And, of course, for people who are fascinated by the scope and depth of the story of Israel, this is a simply great read. It stands alone, but read as a companion to Ari Shavit’s My Promised Land, Erel Shalit’s Hero and His Shadow gives us The Spirit of the Depths in all its dimension. We may not be able to resolve the Arab/Israeli conflict, but we can learn many things from this brave, complex Israeli author, that we can apply to healing the inner and outer wars in our own lives.

The Jung Neumann Conference - A Contribution

The Jung-Neumann Conference
A Celebration of a Creative Relationship


Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015, Trailer FaceBook

When we started planning the Jung Neumann Conference, which took place now half a year ago, we could not know how well it would turn out.

The challenge began in 2012, when as representative of the Erich Neumann Heirs, I signed the agreement to publish the correspondence between Jung and Neumann, together with the Stiftung der Werke von C.G. Jung, and the Philemon Foundation.

After signing, Jung's grandson, Mr. Ulrich Hoerni suggested we launch the book, and hold a conference in Israel.

To fulfill this in the spirit of Jung's and Neumann's writings on the psyche in the world, on evil, ethics, and the shadow, we decided that if there were to be any profit from the conference, we would donate this.

As it turned out, we did make a small profit, and decided to contribute to two organizations:

The Way to Recovery, which brings Palestinian children and adults to treatment in Israeli hospitals. You can read about the organization and its founder, Yuval Roth, here, and on their website.

Amalia, of Road to Recovery

The other organization, Hosen (Resilience), is located in the small town of Sderot, which has suffered thousands of missile attacks from Hamas-controlled Gaza. The organization works with post-trauma, from which many, perhaps most, in the town suffer. It is impressive how this town manages to keep life going, care for the appearance and infra-structure, as well as the psyche of its citizens.

Hilla Barzilai, director of Hosen/Resilience

While Erich Neumann did not work directly with children, after the Holocaust he was acutely aware of the need to treat children. He thus supervised child analysts in the treatment of children coming to Israel from the devastation in Europe.

While sadly there is a need for these organizations, we are pleased to have devoted a small sum of money, and much of our soul and heart, to the important causes that they serve.

Sunday, August 9, 2015

The Deal with Iran is a Bad Deal – Approve it!



Harsh words have been used to criticize the agreement with Iran, according to which inspections are dubious, seemingly much in the hands of the untrustworthy Iranian regime itself. Iran makes it clear that it intends to remain the leading state sponsor of terror in the Middle East (and possibly elsewhere), and has recently increased its advanced military acquisitions from Russia and China.

At a time when sanctions had begun to have a serious impact on the Iranian regime, they were lifted by negotiating this agreement. Whether the United States and the other signatures of the agreement have been naïve, achieving “peace in our time” along the lines of Chamberlain’s agreement with Nazi Germany, or have defused the cloud of nuclear threat, remains to see.

Iranian leader tweets Obama with gun to his head - July 18, 2015 

Those in favor of a liberal and peaceful reaching out toward agreement with a non-liberal, deceitful, cruel and genocidal regime, are naturally in favor of ratifying this severely flawed agreement, and try to convince as that the deal isn't that bad.

And those forces who look at Iran as a severe threat to the world, whether because they are realistic, or because they are inclined to blame the other, want to reject the deal, and to convince us that it is all bad.

While there are both assets and shortcomings to the deal, some of the flaws, such as inspections, seem all too problematic, as does the beyond provocative genocidal intentions that in self-confident arrogance continue to be expressed by Iranian leaders, no less, and perhaps with greater force, after the deal has been agreed upon.

But at this stage to reject the deal is as naïve as its signing. The Iranian regime does not want a deal. They do not want to sign commitments, which, some of them, they will have to break, either deceitfully or, if necessary, openly defy. All they want is the lifting of sanctions, which they have already achieved, with the possibility to continue their nuclear threat, establishing them as the leading force in this area of the world. The United Nations has voted to suspend and lift sanctions, European companies have re-ignited business with Iran, and Russia and China are now openly selling advanced weapons technology and airplanes.


The Iranian parliament has postponed its vote till after the vote in the Congress. An American rejection will put the blame on the US, cause an internal American rift, while simultaneously unite moderates and extremists in the Iranian regime. Nothing will prevent them to increase their significant support of terror and military forces such as Hizballah, and freely develop military nuclear power. No restraints, no limitations, and no sanctions.


This bad deal has trapped the United States, the more moderate Sunni Arab regimes, and Israel. A rejection of the deal will only trap them even further, while Iran is relieved of sanctions, relieved of restrictions, and relieved of blame.

Thus, at this stage, the deal should be approved. However, I suggest the establishment of a Monitoring Committee, headed by the United States, with relatively moderate Sunni States, France and Germany, and Israel. While this committee would not in itself have the means to implement either sanctions or inspections, it can have a strong monitoring capability, a moral impact, and a strong public diplomacy standing. Parallell to the overt monitoring of the implementation (or non-implementation) of details in the agreement, such a monitoring committee would have access to the most advanced intelligence. While a considerably better deal would have been preferable, the deal does provide for a stronger diplomatic stance vis-à-vis Iran. Exposure of non-compliance will therefore have considerably greater impact than without a deal.

Sunday, August 2, 2015

Where was the left when the settlers hijacked Zionism?

In an article in Haaretz Eva illouz asks, “Where was the left when the settlers hijacked Zionism?”

My reply would be as follows:

1. when in the beginning of the 1990s, Peres and Rabin moved toward peace, the left was tired after decades of struggle, and left the work to the reliable leadership of the two. It meant the leaders were left alone on the road to peace, and not actively backed by the public that so much desired exactly that. The streets were therefore left to the right, becoming increasingly anti-Rabin and anti-Peres, till the extent of the horrendous demonstration behind a symbolic coffin – in which Netanyahu participated. This was the reason for that impressive and in the end so tragic gathering, in which Rabin was assassinated.

Demonstration against Rabin - Netanyahu seen from behind

2. During those years of intensive efforts at peace making, buses were blown up by Palestinian terrorists all over the country. The left was paralyzed, and only made ridiculous statements that “when peace comes, buses won’t blow up anymore.” That is, the left was stuck in a cynical fantasy of the “Great peace.” The left should have condemned every act of terror, just like we all condemn the acts of terror by Jewish terrorists. Thus, the left, lost its connection with much of mainstream Israel.


3. Since 1977, Israel has mainly been ruled by the right. All center-left governments since then have been short-lived, but done amazing attempts at reaching out – Rabin, Peres, Barak and Olmert, and Sharon’s unilateral withdrawal from Gaza. The Palestinian response has not been encouraging in any of these cases, even when offered a Palestinian state on all occupied territory (or exchange of equal territory). Responses have been suicide attacks, blown-up buses, endless rockets, war of terror.

4. During all these years, particularly right-wing governments have encouraged increased settlement activity (though it should be kept in mind that Netanyahu – davka – accepted Obama’s request for a ten month settlement freeze to get the Palestinians back to the negotiating table. They didn’t arrive, but asked for prolongation. With increased spending on settlements, money to the ultra-Orthodox, and to defense, the center- and left wing young and middle class Israeli has had to work even harder, pay more taxes, pay more for housing (except in the settlements) – and has not had the strength to continue his or her political activism, while paradoxically paying for those who destroy Israeli democracy.


5. Under the present circumstances, I suggest as one of several steps to be taken, but something that is very concrete and should be implemented immediately (though in steps): Unilateral withdrawal from civilian occupation beyond the security fence. That does not require agreement or reliance on anyone besides Israel itself. It means relocating (the term used by – Michael Oren!) the 20% of the settlers that live in 80% of the settlements (since these are smaller, and scattered all over, and most disruptive to Palestinian statehood).

6. In which country do you find men and women, till their mid-forties, physicians and others, being called up for combat duty, seeing the sons of their friends killed, treating the wounded, and then demonstrating for peace – the peace that almost anyone who has had such experiences yearn for, like the majority of the Israeli population, who is willing to give up the hold on occupied territory to a Palestinian state, alongside Israel?


7. So where was the left? Hard-working, paying taxes, trying to make a living and affordable housing and carry the burden of a country that we love, for which we bleed in so many ways, but refuse to give up the Hope.


From Steve Zemmelman's review in Spring, Summer 2015:

The Hero and His Shadow: Psychopolitical Aspects of Myth and Reality in Israel puts Israel’s recent history on the analyst’s couch with a particular focus on the intertwining development of individual and collective identity in the Jewish state. … For me, it was a particular challenge and pleasure to read this book since, as an American Jew who is on a path of discovery about what it means in my life to be Jewish, there was a great deal here that I found new and challenging. …


The Hero and His Shadow offers an intelligent, sensitive, humanized perspective on the trajectory of events that led to the current tragic situation in the Middle East so specifically detailed in Ari Shavit’s recent book, My Promised Land. Unlike Shavit’s excellent history … Shalit’s analysis reflects a skillful blending of the inner psychological and archetypal dimensions of the problem without collapsing it into a homogeneous whole.

In one section where he discusses the yearning for a strong leader by Israelis and Palestinians who are gripped by terror and the tendency to see the world in terms of polarized opposites, Shalit comments, “peace…poses a threat to those who identify with the quest for grandiose wholeness and totality, in which there is no room for the other." I could not help thinking at the same time about the current situation in American politics where there is so much polarization and such limited capacity on the part of many to see self and other as part of the civic whole.

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Containing A Jungian Light: The Books of Erel Shalit - by Steve Zemmelman

The following is an excerpt from the introduction of Steve Zemmelman's comprehensive review of five of my books, in the latest issue of Spring Journal (which is a particularly interesting issue; for content, see here).

I am deeply grateful to Steve for writing so beautifully - this comprehensive review is a poetic paper in itself.

Dr. Steve Zemmelman

Containing A Jungian Light: The Books of Erel Shalit
by Steve Zemmelman

Dance me to the children who are asking to be born.
Dance me through the curtains that our kisses have outworn
Raise a tent of shelter now, though every thread is torn.
Dance me to the end of love.

I was listening to these lyrics from a song by Leonard Cohen during the time I was reading Erel Shalit’s books for this review, and it struck me how well these poetic lines capture the essential tension between fragmentation and wholeness as they reference past, present and future. They orient the listener to limitation and in so doing suggest a depth of meaning that can only come from facing the inevitability of mortality and the potential for redemption through love. The tune in which the lyrics are embedded is a lamentation with a distinctly Jewish sensibility. It leaves me moved, tearful, despairing and hopeful, all at once. It is soulful, satisfying, and true. It seemed so fitting a soundtrack for a day in which Shalit’s work was so much pulsing through me.

Introduction

It has been my great pleasure over the past year to have studied the body of Erel Shalit’s written work. While at first it felt like an overwhelming task to creatively review a body of work by a highly regarded and prolific colleague, I approached the task I was invited to take on as a unique opportunity for learning and creative reflection.

The effort was more than amply rewarded. In his books one encounters a master interpreter of Jung’s many contributions to depth psychology illuminating a wide range of topics in ways that both present Jung’s foundational psychological thinking and amplify his mythopoetic approach to the soul. Jung’s work navigates between the empirical and the imaginal, engaging with each perspective as both an impetus for and a limitation to the other. Shalit’s work stands solidly in this territory, taking Jung’s original, creative thinking and building upon it, simultaneously enlarging it and nailing it down. While the density of his writing style can be challenging at times, requiring the reader to slow down and ponder the meaning of the words, more often Shalit’s words sing with a poetic, intuitive perspective that grips the reader and leaves him in a state of deep appreciation for the opportunity to contemplate an issue or problem from a new, more enriching, vista.

His books should find their way into many courses on Jungian psychology and analytic training programs as they offer both clear explications of basic concepts without falling into the trap of overly concretistic definitions, as well as thoughtful and scholarly interpretations and amplifications that illustrate and deepen the ideas being discussed. In addition, seasoned analysts can also learn much from these books, about themselves and their patients, and can make good use of these books in teaching this material to others.

• • • • •

In addition to his integration of Jewish knowledge into analytical psychology, Shalit writes as an Israeli deeply troubled by the polarizations in the Middle East, turning the lens of analytical psychology toward the forces and tensions that have shaped Israel from the time of its socialist pioneers in the early 20th century to the present. He makes extensive use of the concepts of projection and shadow in their many forms to call for more humane and just relations between Jews and Palestinians that echoes the call for integration of the shadow by his fellow countryman and first generation Jungian analyst, Erich Neumann, which one finds in his classic work, “Depth Psychology and a New Ethic.” One sees also in Shalit’s work a deep wrestling from the point of view of Joseph Henderson’s ideas about the cultural complex as links are drawn between the intrapsychic and social/cultural dimensions of life.

• • • • •

To read the full review, please do purchase the current issue, or enter a subscription to Spring Journal


If you are interested, you find my books on Amazon. You can also find several of them at the Fisher King Press online bookstore, where you can pay by credit card, PayPal, and your Amazon.com account. (That’s right, you can now pay for your Fisher King Press book orders from the website with your Amazon.com account.)


Forthcoming this fall: 
Erich Neumann: Jacob and Esau - On the collective symbolism of the brother motif
Edited and with an introduction by Erel Shalit
Translated by Mark Kyburz



The Psychoanalytic Relationship between Israel and Switzerland

The C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann Conference
The Psychoanalytic Relationship between Israel and Switzerland
Dr. Andreas Baum, Switzerland's Ambassador to Israel

The following report appeared in the Newsletter of the Swiss Embassy in Israel

Over 250 participants from more than 25 countries gathered on the weekend of the 24-26th of May in Kibbutz Shefayim.

For once the center of the international attraction was neither world politics, nor a high tech business meeting but rather the intellectual relationship and written exchange between two intellectuals. On one side the famous Swiss pioneer of psychology Carl Gustav Jung and, on the other, his outstanding German-Israeli student and counterpart Erich Neumann.

The main reason for the event was the publication of the Jung-Neumann Letters, a book containing their correspondents of over 100 letters, written in a time period of over 30 years, revealing yet unknown discussions on various topics. And consequently the conference, organized by Dr. Erel Shalit, a leading Israeli Jungian psychologist, covered different fields of study: psychological issues, Neumann’s New Ethics, Jung’s art work, European culture, Zionism and the relationship of Judaism and Christianity.

The fact that members of both the Jung and Neumann families were present and spoke at the gathering added poignancy to the conference. Several Swiss Jungian psychologists were also present at the gathering, amongst them the head of the International School of Analytical Psychology of Zurich Murray Stein, and Thomas Fischer, the director of the Stiftung der Werke von C. G. Jung. In this context it was a pleasure for the Swiss Embassy and Ambassador Andreas Baum to host the opening reception at the Kibbutz and greet the audience at the beginning of what turned out to be a successful conference for all participants.

For the speech of Ambassador Baum, please follow this link: www.eda.admin.ch.

Dr. Erel Shalit giving his welcoming speech at
the Jung-Neumann Conference, Kibbutz Shefayim

The Spring Eranos Issue


*****
TABLE OF CONTENTS
A Note from the EditorNancy Cater
Guest Editor’s IntroductionRiccardo Bernardini
I. THE ERANOS PHENOMENON
The Psychological Background of EranosOlga Fröbe–Kapteyn
Eranos: A Space and a Time for ThoughtFabio Merlini
Eranos: A Counter Current to The Common Intellectual History of the 20th Century?Hans Thomas Hakl
II. ERANOS AND THE PSYCHOLOGICAL TRADITION
American Eranos Volume: IntroductionCarl Gustav Jung
Carl Gustav Jung: His Life Before His WorksGian Piero Quaglino
The Analytical Leitmotif of the Eranos ConferencesAntonio Vitolo
Eranos as DreamStephen Aizenstat
III. ERANOS AND THE IDEA OF SACRED
Encounters at AsconaMircea Eliade
On the Edge of the Round Table: Eranos and Theological StudiesDavid L. Miller
Eranos: The Study of Religion as a Religious PhenomenonBernardo Nante
Archetypes and Androgynes at EranosMoshe Idel
IV. PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVES OF ERANOS
The Time of EranosHenry Corbin
Remembrances of EranosMichel Cazenave
The Missing Link: From Jung to Hadot and vice versaRomano Màdera
Non-Duality: The Deep Challenge of Bringing Together Ancient and Modern Ways of Knowledge in an Epistemic World ViewGrazia Shogen Marchianò
V. ERANOS AND THE UNITY OF PSYCHE AND MATTER
Eranos and its MeaningAdolf Portmann and Rudolf Ritsema
The Enlightening Role of Adolf PortmannSigurd von Boletzky
Eranos, Synchronicity, and the I Ching: A Personal JourneyAugusto Shantena Sabbadini
Our Relation to Nature Determines Our Worldview—Eranos and Today’s Great Cultural ChallengeHRH Princess Irene of the Netherlands
VI. ERANOS: HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHS
Historical Photographs
JUNGIANA
Kristine Mann: Jung’s “Miss X” and a Pioneer in PsychoanalysisBeth Darlington
BOOK REVIEWS
Eranos: An Alternative Intellectual History of the Twentieth Century, by Hans Thomas HaklRobert Hinshaw
The Solar Myths and Opicinus de Canistris: Notes of the Seminar given at Eranos in 1943, 
by C . G. Jung, edited by Riccardo Bernardini, Gian Piero Quaglino, and Augusto Romano
Keiron Le Grice
The Life and Ideas of James Hillman, Vol. 1, The Making of a Psychologist, by Dick RussellStanton Marlan
Books by Erel Shalit:Steve Zemmelman
The Complex: Path of Transformation from Archetype to Ego
The Hero and His Shadow: Psychopolitical Aspects of Myth and Reality in Israel, Revised
Enemy, Cripple & Beggar: Shadows in the Hero’s Path
Requiem: A Tale of Exile and Return
The Cycle of Life: Themes and Tales of the Journey
How and Why We Still Read Jung: Personal and Professional Reflections, edited by Jean Kirsch and Murray SteinRoderick Main
Jung and Moreno: Essays on the Theatre of Human Nature, by Craig E. StephensonRobert Macdonald
Spiritual Ecology: The Cry of the Earth, edited by Llewellyn Vaughan-LeeAnn Kutek
Creases in Culture: Essays Toward a Poetics of Depth, by Dennis Patrick SlatterySusan Rowland
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL APPENDICES
Appendix I: Eranos Yearbooks (1933–2014)
Appendix II: Eranos Round Table Sessions (1990–2002)
Appendix III: Proceedings of the Associazione Amici di Eranos (1990–2012)
Appendix IV: Proceedings of the Verein zur Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Tagungen von Eranos (2001–2014)

Saturday, June 13, 2015

Israel and Palestine: one conflict, two wars

Unilateral disengagement from civilian occupation 

The intractable, seemingly unresolvable conflict between the warring Israelis and Palestinians is, of course, considerably more complex than the split emotions it evokes.

One side sees Israel's occupation of Palestinian territory as the source of all ills, and the other side will point at Palestinian denial of the Jewish state's right to exist as the insurmountable evil.

And sadly, both are right.

Israel's nearly fifty years of occupation of the West Bank (and previously of Gaza as well), however 'enlightened' that occupation may be considered, remains - occupation. Occupation of another people, preventing its independence and possibility of fulfilling its national aspirations, inevitably causes resistance from without, Intifada one and two …, and corruption from within. That is, an expansion of geo-political borders on the ground is accompanied by tighter security boundaries, and a loosening of internal ego-boundaries, such as those pertaining to social and political ethics.

And Palestinian rejection of the Jewish State, seeking its extinction rather than peaceful coexistence, digging tunnels of terror rather than bridges of reconciliation, makes even the most far reaching peace proposal futile, as happened in 2000 and 2006, when Arafat and Abbas rejected the agreements proposed by Barak and Olmert respectively.

When, all too rarely, there is progress in peace talks, it is counterbalanced by terror, and by settlement expansion. Likewise, stalemate between the sides is counter weighed by explosive undercurrents that await eruption.

I believe the two parallel wars – Israel’s war of occupation, and the Palestinians’ war to destroy Israel - need to be recognized, separated from each other, and dealt with differently. And the world community, which too easily gets excited when the gladiators tear each other asunder, needs to help carry the complexity, rather than take sides with either of the warring opponents, thus reinforcing the split-mindedness of the conflict.

From an Israeli perspective, I suggest the following steps to deal with the two wars:

1. Ensure security; which already is constantly on Israel’s agenda, and carried out – at a high price - with great efficiency;

2. Define a temporary border. In fact, the notorious security fence does this quite well; 9-13% of the West Bank remains west of the fence. That is, 87-90% of the West Bank remains outside the security fence, to establish a demilitarized Palestinian state with temporary, but near-complete borders.

© Shaul Arieli, http://www.shaularieli.com
3. Separate between civilian and military occupation:
a. Withdrawal from civilian occupation beyond the self-defined temporary border, and beyond the big settlement blocs; i.e., from close to 90% of the West Bank. Relocate the many small and scattered settlements - in which a minority of settlers reside, to inside the security fence, i.e., the self-defined, temporary but distinct border, preferably by offering compensation for voluntary relocation; 
b. Retain military occupation for security needs, but step by step, increase the territory handed over to Palestinian civilian authority – and eventually, as well, security control. Practical and creative solutions to ensure security cooperation can be provided – some are already implemented. Each limited territorial step, as part of a long range plan, should be accompanied by steps of mutuality, agreed upon by both sides. If no agreement, no military withdrawal, until security control can be transferred.

c. That is, unilateral civilian disengagement and withdrawal from occupied territories beyond the security fence, but negotiated step-by-step military withdrawal, with increased Palestinian security responsibility in those areas added to its sovereign territory.
4. Withdrawal from occupation, and geo-political arrangements are necessary to set concrete boundaries for each side’s national desires. In addition, both sides would need to do the in-depth psychological work on a collective basis regarding identity and collective fantasies. On the Israeli side it would entail, among other issues, surrendering a sense of ‘historical rights’ to realpolitik, and on the Palestinian side, issues such as transforming an identity of victimhood into self-reliance. In Israel, only a minority of the electorate – as opposed to a majority of the elected, still adhere and demand Greater Israel. The Palestinians, as well, will have to mourn giving up the fantasy of Greater Palestine, replacing Israel. The process of even minimal Israeli withdrawal from occupied territory must be accompanied by cessation of the horrendous incitement in Palestinian media, schools and mosques.

5. In the long run, in order to ensure viability, low-level yet confederative frameworks of cooperation, can be conducive, such as Gaza-Israel-West Bank/Palestinian Authority-Jordan. At some level, cooperative arrangements are already in place.

The critical issue at this time is withdrawal from civilian occupation beyond the big settlement blocs (located along the cease-fire lines), while incremental withdrawal from military occupation when agreements can be reached.

Erel Shalit



By Elizabeth Clark-Stern

Psychiatrist Carl Jung wrote in The Red Book of the distinction between “The Spirit of the Times” and “The Spirit of the Depths”. We see this vividly demonstrated when we put Ari Shavit’s acclaimed new book My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel alongside Erel Shalit’s classic work, The Hero and His Shadow: Psychopolitical Aspects of Myth and Reality in Israel. The former takes us through the history of the heroic creation of Israel, including the darkest “shadow” behaviors of the Jewish state in the 1948 massacre of the Arabs of Lydda.

In the latter work, Erel Shalit tells us why.

This is no simplistic psychological analysis. The brilliance of this Israeli Jungian analyst is that he offers no easy solutions, plumbing the paradox of the necessary heroic identity of the Jewish state, and yet, around every corner is the shadow of every hero: the beggar, the frightened one, the part of all of us that is dependent on forces outside of our control.

It is also very important to note that Erel Shalit’s book is fascinating reading for anyone interested in the inner workings of the soul. On one level Israel is the backdrop for the author to explore how shadow, myth, and projection work in all of us, regardless of our life circumstance, nationality, environment, or history. It even includes a comprehensive glossary of Jungian terms that has some of the best definitions I have ever encountered, and hence a find for readers new to Jung.

And, of course, for people who are fascinated by the scope and depth of the story of Israel, this is a simply great read. It stands alone, but read as a companion to Ari Shavit’s My Promised Land, Erel Shalit’s Hero and His Shadow gives us The Spirit of the Depths in all its dimension. We may not be able to resolve the Arab/Israeli conflict, but we can learn many things from this brave, complex Israeli author, that we can apply to healing the inner and outer wars in our own lives.

Monday, June 8, 2015

Kibbutz Choir performance at the Jung Neumann Conference


The Jung-Neumann Letters
An International Conference in Celebration of a Creative Relationship


Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015,
Conference Website Trailer  FaceBook
  
And in between, there was music.
The following piece is from the delightful performance by the Kibbutz Choir
  
video

©Hugh Milstein DigitalFusion

Thanks to Hugh Milstein for the video!

Saturday, June 6, 2015

Pythia Peay: America on the Couch



Pythia Peay has written an exceptional book, combining her own deep insights, with those of a wealth of psychoanalysts.

From the back matter:
What lies behind America s historic romance with the gun? Why does it have such a troubled relationship with alcohol and drugs? Why is it so wedded to consumerism and so resistant to the evidence of climate change? What are its enduring myths about individuality, freedom, and independence, and how might we re-imagine our vision of the United States as the Promised Land and The City on the Hill to reflect a multiculturalism that offers the last, best hope for the world?


In a two-decades long journey through the American psyche, depth journalist Pythia Peay has asked these and many more questions of no fewer than thirty-six of the world s leading psychologists and psychoanalysts. From Robert Jay Lifton to Marion Woodman, A. Thomas McLellan to Judith V. Jordan, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi to June Singer, and James Hillman to Mary Pipher, the thinkers in America on the Couch discuss violence, addiction, the environment, capitalism and consumerism, politics and power, and the soul of America. The result is a uniquely comprehensive, wide-ranging, and compelling kaleidoscope of insights into the psychodynamics of a hegemon in peace and at war, as it confronts the shadows of the American century and charts its way into an uncertain, multi-polar future.

Featuring:
Stephen Aizenstat; John Beebe; Bonnie Bright; Gary S. Bobroff; Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi; Philip Cushman; Larry Decker; Raymond De Young; Edward Edinger; Michael Eigen; Stephen J. Foster; Charles Grob; Bud Harris; A. Chris Heath; James Hillman; Judith V. Jordan; Donald Kalsched; Robert J. Langs; Linda Schierse Leonard; Harriet Lerner; Robert Jay Lifton; A. Thomas McLellan; Thomas Moore; Ginette Paris; Mary Pipher; Ernest Rossi; Andrew Samuels; Erel Shalit; June Singer; Thomas Singer; Lawrence Staples; Murray Stein; Charles B. Strozier; Paul Wachtel; Karen B. Walant; Marion Woodman; Luigi Zoja

In her introduction, Pythia Peay writes:
"The six parts of America on the Couch offer a wealth of perspectives on those symptomatic areas of life in this country where we are faced with continually recurring problems - but also where we may break through to new understandings."
Having been invited, as an Israeli, to share my views, looking across the oceans from the Levant, America's shadows might be undeniable - but so is its light. And the light that emanates from the conscious scrutiny of one's shadow, is admirable. Every society has its shadow; the decisive difference is if it is projected, or if society is open enough to dialogue with its cultural complexes.

Thursday, May 21, 2015

A report from the Jung Neumann Conference, April 24-26, at kibbutz Shefayim

Official launch of
The Jung-Neumann Letters
An International Conference in Celebration of a Creative Relationship
Kibbutz Shefayim, April 24-26, 2015, Trailer FaceBook

A report by Lisbeth von Benedek.
The French is followed by the report in English.

Lisbeth von Benedek

Un congrès international en Israël à l'occasion de la sortie du livre "Analytical Psychology in Exile, The correspondence of C. G. Jung and Erich Neumann"

Ce congrès était l'occasion de souligner l'importance de la relation entre Neumann et Jung, rappelée par Martin Liebscher dans son introduction au livre sur leur Correspondance. Ils se sont rencontrés pour la première fois à Berlin en 1933 ; Neumann avait alors 28 ans et finissait ses études de médecine ; Jung, à 58 ans, était reconnu sur le plan international. Neumann, l'un des plus doués parmi ses étudiants, était capable de dialoguer fermement avec son aîné - notamment sur la position de Jung à propos de la question juive. Neumann et Jung ont correspondu pendant une trentaine d'années, l'un en Palestine depuis 1934, autre à Zurich - jusqu'à la mort prématurée de Neumann en 1960. Ces lettres mettent aussi en lumière la pensée politique de Jung, son attitude face à la question juive, ainsi que sa compréhension de la psychologie et du mysticisme juif.


Près de 300 personnes de 26 pays ont participé avec enthousiasme à ce congrès. Dès l'ouverture, Erel Shalit situait l'atmosphère et le niveau de ce congrès. Vendredi soir l'ouverture du Shabbat, à laquelle tous les congressistes ont été conviées, a été célébré par Tony Woolfson et Henry Abramovitch, toujours présent avec sa générosité, son accueil et sa joie.

Tout au long de ce congrès l'atmosphère était chaleureuse, conviviale et l'organisation impressionnante - avec un respect du cadre, une autodiscipline des orateurs, un respect du temps accordé, avec donc une absence de tension et de l'espace pour les questions. Les différentes présentations étaient d'une profondeur rare et les questions posées témoignaient de la réflexion des intervenants sur les sujets en question.
De plus, la créativité des organisateurs était remarquable : des lettres échangés entre Jung et Neumann, commentées par Murray Stein, étaient lus avec talent et conviction par deux analystes : Paul Brutsche au nom de Jung et John Hill au nom de Neumann. D'autre part, des extraits du film de Bergman sur "La flute enchantée" de Mozart, étaient commentés dans l'optique de Neumann et de Jung, par Tom Kelly et Dvorah Kuchinsky. Par ailleurs des enfants et petits enfants de Jung et de Neumann ont apportés des témoignages touchants.

Deux présentations stimulantes traitaient de la position de Jung et de Neumann face au "Mal", une par Henry Abramovitch sur "La recherche d'une nouvelle éthique" et une autre par Murray Stein à propos de la "Nouvelle éthique" de Neumann et de "La réponse à Job" de Jung. De plus, a été discutée la rivalité fraternelle entre les deux leaders de la psychanalyse jungienne à Tel Aviv, Neumann et Kirsch.

L'exposé de Paul Mendes-Flohr sur "La culture allemande et la découverte de l'inconscient: la promesse et les mécontentements de l'expérience juive-allemande" était dense et impressionnant par l'étendu de la culture - y compris kabbaliste.

L'art était aussi présent à ce congrès. Pour commencer, Tamar Kron a présenté et commenté les peintures de Neumann, dont certaines avaient un "air de famille" avec quelques planches du Livre Rouge. Deux présentations, évoquant la fonction de l'art et de l'artiste selon Jung et Neumann, avaient l'honneur de clôturer ce congrès : Gideon Ofrat exposait les "Grandes Mères dans l'art d'Israël", et Christian Gaillard présentait "Jung, Neumann et l'art", insistant sur le fait que l'art, selon la lecture jungienne, incarnait bien souvent, au delà de la Grande Mère, une régression jusqu'au démembrement.

Je garde de ce congrès le souvenir d'une ferveur, d'une volonté d'accueillir, de comprendre et du désir d'aller le plus loin possible. Les points de vue différents, parfois opposés, étaient reçus d'une manière tranquille ; ainsi Murray Stein répondait à une intervention contradictoire, avec un sourire bienveillant : "votre Jung n'est pas le mien".

Lisbeth von Benedek
Paris, le15 mai 2015
Lisbeth von Benedek est psychanalyste, membre de l‘IAAP et de la SFPA ; elle vit et travaille à Paris

Lisbeth von Benedek, docteur en psychologie, est psychanalyste didacticienne de la SFPA (Institut C.-G. JUNG, France). Elle a été responsable, pendant une vingtaine d'années, de l'enseignement de la psychologie clinique et de l'introduction à la psychanalyse à l'Université Paris XIII

An international conference in Israel on the occasion of the release of the book "Analytical Psychology in Exile:The correspondence of CG Jung and Erich Neumann"
April 24-26 2015, Shefayim, Israel.

This conference was an opportunity to highlight the importance of the relationship between Neumann and Jung, as recalled by Martin Liebscher in his introduction of the book on their correspondence. They first met in Berlin in 1933; Neumann was then 28 years and finished his medical studies; Jung, at 58, was internationally renowned. Neumann, one of the most gifted among his students, was able to firmly confront Jung - including his inner attitude in regards to the Jews. Neumann and Jung corresponded for thirty years, one living in Palestine since 1934, the other one in Zurich - until Neumann’s premature death in 1960. These letters also highlight political thoughts of Jung, as well as his understanding of Jewish psychology and mysticism.

Nearly 300 people from 26 countries participated with enthusiasm in this conference. In his opening welcome, Erel Shalit set the tone of the atmosphere and announced the challenging level of the presentations. Friday night, all participants were invited to the opening of Shabbat which was celebrated by Tony Woolfson and Henry Abramovich, always present with his generosity, hospitality and joy.

Throughout the conference the atmosphere was warm and friendly; besides that the organization impressive - with precise respect for the setting and the time allowed for the speakers, which prohibited tension and gave enough space for the questions. The presentations were of a rare depth and questions from the participants witnessed their own thoughtful reflections upon the topics in question.

In addition, the creativity of the organizers was remarkable: significant letters exchanged between Jung and Neumann emphasized by Murray Stein, were read with talent and conviction by two analysts: Paul Brutsche on behalf of Jung and John Hill on behalf of Neumann. Moreover, film excerpts of Bergman’s "Magic Flute" by Mozart were commented upon by Tom Kelly and Dvorah Kuchinsky, according to Jung’s and Neumann’s conceptions of the psyche. Furthermore, Jung’s and Neumann’s children and grandchildren gave moving testimonies of their respective fathers and families.

Two stimulating presentations gave an account of Jung’s and Neumann’s points of view in regards to the "Evil", one by Henry Abramovich on "The search for a new ethic" and another by Murray Stein discussing Neumann’s "New ethics" and Jung’s "The answer to Job". Additionally, there was room to discuss the sibling rivalry between the two leaders of Jungian psychoanalysis - Neumann and Kirsch - in Tel Aviv.

The presentation by Paul Mendes-Flohr on "German culture and the discovery of the unconscious: the promise and the discontent of the German-Jewish experience" highlighted the speaker’s widespread cultural knowledge, including that of the Kabbala, in relation to the Jungian perspective.

Art was also present at this conference. To start with, Tamar Kron presented and commented on paintings of Neumann, some of which had a "familiar resemblance" with some illustrations of the Red Book. Two presentations, evoking the function of art and the artist according to Jung and Neumann, had the honor of closing the conference: Gideon Ofrat exposed the "Great Mothers in Israeli art", and Christian Gaillard presented "Jung, Neumann and Art", insisting that art, according to Jungian reading, often embodies, beyond the Great Mother, a regression towards bodily disintegration and dismemberment.

I will always remember the ardor, the willingness to welcome, to understand and the desire to go as far as possible that I witnessed during this conference. The different, sometimes opposing point of views, were received with tranquility; thus, Murray Stein responded to a contradictory comment from one of the participants, with a warm smile: "Your Jung is not mine."

Paris, May 15TH 2015

Lisbeth von Benedek, Doctor of Psychology and Psychoanalyst, is a member of the IAAP and SFPA, Institute C.G. Jung, France. She was responsible, for more than twenty years, for teaching clinical psychology and the introduction of psychoanalysis at the University Paris XIII.

The lectures from the conference will be published in a volume edited by Erel Shalit and Murray Stein,
A Creative Relationship – C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann.

The photos from the conference by Odeliya Harel.